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first_img Image source: Getty Images See all posts by Edward Sheldon, CFA ITM Power’s share price has crashed. Should I buy the stock now? Edward Sheldon, CFA | Monday, 10th May, 2021 | More on: ITM FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. ITM Power (LSE: ITM) shares have recently delivered disappointing returns. While the hydrogen energy stock is still up about 140% over the last year, it’s fallen nearly 50% since 27 January when it hit an all-time high of 725p.Is this share price pullback a buying opportunity for me? Let’s take a look at the investment case.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…ITM Power shares: the bull caseI can see why ITM Power is a popular stock at the moment (last week, it was the most purchased stock on Hargreaves Lansdown).For starters, it operates in a high-growth industry. According to Grand View Research, the global green hydrogen market size is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 14.2% from 2020 to 2027.Meanwhile, according to Goldman Sachs, green hydrogen is a “once-in-a-generation opportunity.” It estimates it could give rise to a €10trn addressable market globally by 2050 for the utilities industry alone. This market growth should provide tailwinds for ITM Power.Secondly, ITM has signed deals with some major players in the industry. Already, it has formed partnerships with multinational chemical company Linde (the largest industrial gas company by market share and revenue), Italian energy infrastructure company Snam, energy powerhouse Royal Dutch Shell, and Scottish Power. These deals suggest the company’s technology has significant potential.Third, the company has received some encouraging coverage from brokers. In February, for example, JP Morgan initiated coverage of the stock with an ‘overweight’ rating and a price target of 700p (80% higher than the current share price). Meanwhile, Barclays has also initiated coverage of the stock with another ‘overweight’ rating, saying the stock should reflect the growth potential of the green hydrogen industry over the next decade.Overall, the growth story looks quite exciting.The bear caseHowever, I do have a few reservations about ITM Power shares. One is that the company is still very speculative in nature right now. This is illustrated by the fact that for the six months to 31 October 2020, the group posted revenue of just £0.2m (down from £2.4m a year earlier). It also posted a loss from operations of £12m (up from £9.8m a year earlier).It’s worth noting ITM Power isn’t expected to be profitable in the near future. For the year ending 30 April 2022, analysts expect the group to post a net loss of £16.5m. This adds risk to the investment case. Company stocks that aren’t yet profitable tend to be highly volatile (and often turn out to be poor investments).Another concern is the valuation. At its current share price, ITM Power has a market-cap of about £2.2bn. That looks way too high to me. For the year ending 30 April 2022, analysts expect the group to generate revenue of just £31m. That puts the stock on a forward-looking price-to-sales ratio of about 70. That’s over five times more expensive than Tesla, which is generally considered to be a very expensive stock.ITM Power shares: my move nowWeighing everything up, I won’t be buying ITM Power for my portfolio. In my view, the stock is too speculative and the valuation’s way too high.All things considered, I think there are much better growth stocks I could buy today. Enter Your Email Address Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Edward Sheldon owns shares in Hargreaves Lansdown and Royal Dutch Shell. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Tesla. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Barclays and Hargreaves Lansdown. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Like this one… I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free.last_img read more

first_imgColumnsDeriving The Meaning Of ‘Wage’: A Comparative Analysis Of The Payment Of Wages Act, 1936 And The Code On Wages, 2019 Nandini Gulati & Abhishek Abhi18 Dec 2020 9:29 PMShare This – xA long-standing industry demand was the rationalisation and codification of labour laws. While the industry demands simplification and minimum compliance, the labour unions on the other side paint a grim picture about the lack of compliances of even existing labour laws. There were many attempts to revise the labour laws. The Union Government appointed the Second National Commission…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA long-standing industry demand was the rationalisation and codification of labour laws. While the industry demands simplification and minimum compliance, the labour unions on the other side paint a grim picture about the lack of compliances of even existing labour laws. There were many attempts to revise the labour laws. The Union Government appointed the Second National Commission on Labour Laws, which submitted its report in June 2002. The Commission proposed that the existing set of labour laws should be narrowly divided into four classes and grouped together. The Union Government acting on the recommendations has proposed that four labour codes will be enacted, subsuming 29 legislations on labour laws. The Code on Wages, 2019 is the first of the lot to receive legislative approval and, subsequently, the President of India’s assent on August 8, 2019. The Code on Wages, 2019 (the Code) seeks to amend and consolidate the laws relating to wages and bonus and matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. It amalgamates and subsumes four imperative labour laws – the Payment of Wages Act, 1936; the Minimum Wages Act, 1948; the Payment of Bonus Act, 1965; and the Equal Remuneration Act, 1976. The Code provides for the universal applicability of the provisions for prompt payment of wages and minimum wages to all workers regardless of the wage ceiling and sector, unlike the Payment of Wages Act, which is applicable to employees receiving wages below the statutory limit, and the Minimum Wages Act, which is applicable to employees engaged in scheduled establishments. The Code has expanded the definition of ’employer’ as well as ’employee’ after putting together separate prior legislations under a single umbrella, resulting in a wide-ranging applicability of the regulations which is now applicable to workers in both organised and unorganised sectors. In order to encourage deregulation and promote ease of doing business, several changes were brought in via the Code on Wages, 2019. Additionally, the Code attempts to streamline India’s labour law enforcement process by providing a uniform statutory framework for it. The new definition of the term wages under Section 2(y) of the Code is a significant reform implemented by the Code. It marks a departure under the aforementioned Acts from earlier meanings of wages. Thus, to comprehend its import it is imperative to analyse this definition and juxtapose it with that under the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 Wages under Code on Wages, 2019 – How different from that provided in the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 The definition of ‘wages’ varies across labour legislations in India. The Code on Wages, 2019 endeavours to provide a single uniform definition of wages as applicable to minimum wages, payment of wages and payment of bonus with an intent to minimise disputes and litigations and also reduce compliance cost for employers. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936 applies to the payment of wages to persons employed in factories and to persons employed in any industrial or other establishment. However, the Code has broadened the scope by extending its applicability to all the establishments. Section 2(y) of the Code defines Wages as all remuneration whether by way of salaries, allowances or otherwise, expressed in terms of money or capable of being so expressed which would, if the terms of employment, express or implied, were fulfilled, be payable to a person employed in respect of his employment or of work done in such employment. This part of definition is verbatim similar to that of the definition provided under Section 2(vi)[1] of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936 defined wages very comprehensively and broadly. Under the Code, there are now three parts to the definition of wages: inclusionary part, exclusionary part and the conditions which limits the effect of exclusions. The following components form the inclusive part of the definition under the Code on Wages – basic paydearness allowanceretaining allowance, if any. Unlike the definition under the Payment of Wages Act of 1936, the definition under the Code aims to provide a list of items that are not included in this updated concept of wage such as – any bonus payable under any law for the time being in force, which does not form part of the remuneration payable under the terms of employment; the value of any house-accommodation, or of the supply of light, water, medical attendance or other amenity or of any service excluded from the computation of wages by a general or special order of the appropriate Government;any contribution paid by the employer to any pension or provident fund, and the interest which may have accrued thereon;any conveyance allowance or the value of any travelling concession;any sum paid to the employed person to defray special expenses entailed on him by the nature of his employment;house rent allowance;remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a court or Tribunal;any overtime allowance;any commission payable to the employee;any gratuity payable on the termination of employment;any retrenchment compensation or other retirement benefit payable to the employee or any ex gratia payment made to him on the termination of employment. The first proviso to Section 2(y) under the Code states the exclusions mentioned must not exceed 50 per cent of all remuneration and, if they are exceeded, the excess sum shall be treated as remuneration and shall be regarded as wages. This is intended to ensure that organizations do not pursue compensation structures that result in a reduction of wages below 50% of overall remuneration. However, it is not wrong to contend that such an approach will be seldom effective. The second proviso to Section 2(y) under the Code basically provides that for the purposes of equal wages to all genders, the emoluments specifically excluded under clauses (d), (f), (g) and (h) becomes relevant and shall be taken for the computation of wages. Finally, the explanation offered under the definition of wages in the Code provides that if an employee earns remuneration in kind from his employer, the amount of which does not exceed 15% of the total salary payable to him shall be considered to constitute part of the salary of that employee. This is basically meant to disincentivize employers to pay in kind. Issues with the new Definition The inclusionary part of the new definition has only three items, which is two less than that provided under the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. Moreover, the list of exclusions under the Code is much longer than that of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. What is even more startling in this regard is the fact that some of the inclusionary clauses under Payment of Wages Act, 1936 has now come to be a part of the list of exclusions. The remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court which was an inclusionary clause under Section 2(vi) – (a) of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 is now excluded from the definition of wages by virtue of Section 2(y) – (g) of the Code on Wages, 2019. Similarly, any overtime allowance [2(vi) – (b)], commission payable to employee [2(vi) – (c)], and retrenchment compensation [2(vi) – (d)], which were previously protected have been excluded from the definition of wages and is now a part of the list of exclusions. [Section 2(y) – (h), 2(y) – (i), 2(y) – (k)] Furthermore, the residuary clause in the veil of Section 2(vi)-(e) of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 provided an added protection to the employees and working class. It sets forth that wages may include any sum payable to which the person employed is entitled under any scheme framed under any law for the time being in force. No such residuary clause is present in the Code on Wages, 2019. The plausible explanation behind the new definition is to ensure that employers include the majority of the salary of an employee in the first three components, i.e. basic, dearness allowance and retaining allowance, in order to prevent inclusion of other components in the wages component at a later stage. While this is a move undertaken with good intentions, but since the government actively controls incentives, it may lead to problems, making it impossible for employers to formulate their own wage structures. In particular, this would be troublesome for employees who use variable and deliverable associated performance-based components to earn significant chunks of their wages. In the case of sales managers, for example, who draw different amounts depending on the nature of their travel, performance goals, etc. Furthermore, the inclusion of gratuity payments and other retirement benefits into the definition of wages through first proviso seems vague as this runs counter to the basic purpose behind such payments and would lead to an unwanted increase in the cost of the employer. Additionally, it would make the whole payroll system complicated and eventually the end results would remain somewhat similar leading to a great deal of confusion. As already mentioned, the Code excludes ‘remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties’ from the definition of wages without providing any explanation. All salaries are negotiated in a unionised community under agreements between the employer and unionised employees, which mostly last two to three years or more. To suggest that none of these mutually agreed and settled compensation components can be regarded as ‘wages’ for some purposes is quite pointless. However, the second proviso clarifies that this element along with few others will be included for the purposes of equal wages to all genders, it still does not make the reason for its exclusion for other purposes intelligible. In order to summarise this new Code, from the point of view of giving a uniform effect to the four major labour laws of this country, it can be said that this Code is of great significance. In addition, the Code has implemented much-needed reforms in the labour sector through which the convergence, rationalisation and simplification of labour-related regulations is now on course. From the above discussions, it is correct to conclude that in an effort to simplify the law, the Code on Wages, 2019 appears to have created some further chaos and confusion. A simpler approach would have been to address the concept of wages based on core concepts (and if possible, through illustrations and examples, as many other statutes do), instead of a complex definition with plenty of other inclusions, exclusions, provisos and explanations. Although the intentions behind the introduction of a uniform definition of wages are fairly positive, their impact remains to be seen. The Code endeavours to offer a new meaning to the old labour laws of centuries which were enacted historically at different points in time and to deal with different situations. The combining of asymmetrical laws into a single code is not an easy task and will undoubtedly create a set of new problems. The first and only important thing required for achieving the desired results is to adequately enforce the requirements of the Code in a standardised way which can be done only by improving the standard of regulatory authorities.Views are personal. [1] “wages” means all remuneration (whether by way of salary, allowances or otherwise) expressed in terms of money or capable of being so expressed which would, if the terms of employment, express or implied, were fulfilled, be payable to a person employed in respect of his employment or of work done in such employment, and includes- (a) any remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court; (b) any remuneration to which the person employed is entitled in respect of overtime work or holidays or any leave period; (c) any additional remuneration payable under the terms of employment (whether called a bonus or by any other name); (d) any sum which by reason of the termination of employment of the person employed is payable under any law, contract or instrument which provides for the payment of such sum, whether with or without deductions but does not provide for the time within which the payment is to be made; (e) any sum to which the person employed is entitled under any scheme framed under any law for the time being in force; but does not include— (1) any bonus (whether under a scheme of profit sharing or otherwise) which does not form part of the remuneration payable under the terms of employment or which is not payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court; (2) the value of any house-accommodation, or of the supply of light, water, medical attendance or other amenity or of any service excluded from the computation of wages by a general or special order of 1[the appropriate Government]; (3) any contribution paid by the employer to any pension or provident fund, and the interest which may have accrued thereon; (4) any travelling allowance or the value of any travelling concession; (5) any sum paid to the employed person to defray special expenses entailed on him by the nature of his employment; or (6) any gratuity payable on the termination of employment in cases other than those specified in sub-clause (d). 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first_img“In addition, the MiFID II portfolio manager or its third country sub-adviser which operates an RPA must be able, at all times and based on its own internal allocation/budgeting process, to identify vis-à-vis its own clients the amount spent on research with a particular third country broker-dealer.”In a related announcement today, the US regulator confirmed that US-based asset managers and broker-dealers would not be in breach of US law when complying with MiFID II’s cost unbundling requirements.The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said it would grant a 30-month window for managers to find a way to unbundle research costs from trading costs for European clients, while still complying with US rules.In the US, asset managers usually pay for brokerage services and research through a “bundled” commission payment, which runs contrary to MiFID II rules. Investors had expressed concern that they could lose access to “valuable” research, the SEC said.SEC chairman Jay Clayton said the “no-action relief” was designed in conjunction with European regulators and the European Commission.The SEC said in a statement: “Subject to various terms and conditions: broker-dealers, on a temporary basis, may receive research payments from money managers in hard dollars or from advisory clients’ research payment accounts; money managers may continue to aggregate orders for mutual funds and other clients; and money managers may continue to rely on an existing safe harbour when paying broker-dealers for research and brokerage.”During the 30-month period, which begins on 3 January when MiFID II is implemented in Europe, SEC staff will monitor the impact of the European rules in order to decide on what (if any) longer-term action is needed.Andrew Bailey, chief executive of the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), said: “In supervising the MiFID II inducements and research provisions, and cross-border practices by firms in this area, the FCA will focus on ensuring investors’ interests are advanced.“Arrangements which comply with MiFID II and other jurisdictions’ rules, while enabling EU firms’ continued access to research produced by US and other non-EU jurisdictions, are likely to be the best way of serving investors.”According to IPE’s list of the biggest 120 managers of European institutional assets, 54 are based partially or wholly outside of the EU in countries such as the US, Switzerland, Canada and Australia. Non-EU managers can continue to bundle trading costs and research costs as long as the two are distinguishable from each other, the European Commission has said.The Commission today published guidance detailing how MiFID II rules on the provision of investment research would apply to non-EU managers with clients inside the bloc.In a statement, Valdis Dombrovskis, the Commission’s vice-president for financial services, said the guidance would provide “greater clarity” on the new requirements.The guidance states: “The MiFID II portfolio manager or its third country sub-adviser which operates a [research payment account, or RPA] is responsible for managing its research budget based on a reasonable assessment of the need for research and subject to appropriate controls, which include maintaining a clear audit trail of payments made to research providers.last_img read more

first_imgMeanwhile Swansea moved a point clear of the relegation zone after being held to a nil-nil draw by fellow strugglers Middlesbrough. Arsenal came from behind twice to secure a 2-2 Premier League draw with Manchester City.The result leaves Arsene Wenger’s side sixth – seven points away from the Champions League places.He says it’s a result that should give them confidence heading into their final ten top flight matches of the season.last_img

first_imgBosnia-Herzegovina’s top skier twenty-years-old Elvedina Muzaferija today wrote down the history of BiH skiing by winning the first points for Bosnia-Herzegovina in the World Cup skiing run at the Austrian Altenmarkt-Zauchensee.After the first run, the BiH skier was 31st, mostly due to the fact that as many as 16 skiers did not reach the finish line, but nevertheless she managed to finish the race in the second run and thus write down the history of the sport. Muzaferija finished first with a time of 1: 18,40, which was 4.6 seconds behind Italian winner Federica Brignone, while she finished second with a time of 54.30. Overall, Elvedina finished 2: 12.70, 9.35 seconds behind Federica Brignone, Klix.ba news portal reports.last_img read more

first_imgByers, Micky61Wellington, KSSumner County Family Care CenterWellington PDDisorderly Conduct, Interference with LEO5/20/15 Oxford0 Silva, Jose37Ennis, TXKTA I-35 MP 19KHPInterference w/ LEO, Driving under influence, Transporting Open Container, Operate a motor vehicle without a valid license, Refusal to submit a preliminary breath test5/23/15 NameAgeHome TownArrest locationAgencyChargesArrest date KHP4 Smith, Grant30Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOFailure to Appear5/18/15 Ramos, Santiago44Wichita, KS500 N Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence5/21/15 Berens, Brent30Towanda, KS777 Kansas Star Dr, Mulvane, KSMulvane PDUse/Possess drug paraphernalia, Possession of opiate, opium, narcotic, or certain stimulant5/19/15 Lauffer, Sharissa20Oxford, KSUS 81 and 70th Ave, Wellington, KSSUSODriving Under Influence5/20/15 Richey, Charlotte55Peck, KS500 N US 81, Wellington, KSSUSODriving Under Influence5/24/15 Sumner Newscow report — The Sumner County Sheriff Office report for May 18 to May 25, 2015 weekly jail bookings are as follows:  Tomlin, Julionna26Argonia, KS300 W 8th, Wellington, KSWellington PDDriving while license suspended5/20/15 Bookings Sumner Co12 Turcotte, Daniel25Mulvane, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence5/22/15 Welch, Kindra34Wichita, KS1400 N US 81SUSOProbation Violation5/21/15 Popplewell, Thaddeus35Caldwell, KS320 S Main St, Caldwell, KSCaldwell PDCriminal Trespass, Violation of Protection Order5/21/15 Randall, Brandon27Belle Plaine, KS500 N Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence5/21/15 Bail Bondsman0 Asbury, Joshua22Wellington, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSWellington PDServing Sentence5/23/15 Peterson, Brenden24Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOProbation Violation5/18/15 Mulvane1 Harper1 Total67 Whittemore, Theodore59Derby, KS777 Kansas Star Dr, Mulvane, KSKRGCAssault, Disorderly Conduct5/24/15 Weitzel, Daniel46Caldwell, KS322 W Central, Caldwell, KSCaldwell PDBattery5/24/15 Younker, Cress54Wellington, KS600 N A St, Wellington, KSWellington PDDriving while license suspended5/22/15 Clarke, John57Wellington, KS916 S C St., Wellington, KSSUSOProbation Violation X25/20/15 Harris, Robert40Wellington, KS100 W 8th St, Wellington, KSSUSODriving while license suspended5/23/15 Belle Plaine0 Kingman1 Forester, Shane39Wellington, KS1400 E 16th, Wellington, KSWellington PDProbation Violation X35/21/15 Taylor, Robert30Wellington, KS16th and Day, Wellington, KSWellington PDFailure to Appear5/22/15 Altwegg, Kristin34Austin, TXI-35 MP 4KHPDriving Under Influence, Transporting an Open Container5/19/15 Marks, John62Wichita, KSI-35 MP 25KHPTheft, Possession of Stolen property5/23/15 KRGC1 McCarther, Brian30Wichita, KSI-35 MP 21KHPDriving while license suspended5/24/15 Phelps, Michael36Wichita, KS500 N Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOProbation Violation5/19/15 Vaughtlers, Jessica25Belle Plaine, KS800 E 120th Ave N, Belle Plaine, KSSUSODriving while license suspended5/22/15 Sedgwick Co36 Wellington PD9 Fanning, Jessica27Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOFailure to Appear5/18/15 Caldwell PD2 Wood, Terry35Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOProbation Violation5/19/15 Griffis, Dustin27Wellington, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence5/23/15 Smith, Jesse28Belle Plaine, KS500 N Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence5/21/15 Sharkey, Monica37Anthony, KS1177 E 16th, Wellington, KS 67152Wellington PDPossession of certain stimulant, Possession of paraphernalia5/25/15 Norris, Shannon46Wellington, KS1302 N B, Wellington, KS 67152Wellington PDDomestic Battery5/21/15 Hatfield, Mark36Wellington, KS610 E Hillside, Wellington, KSWellington PDServing Sentence5/21/15         Monday 0600 to Monday 0600  WEEKLY   BOOKINGS 5/18/2015 thru 5/25/2015 last_img read more

first_imgA team of volunteers have set out to restore a piece of history at one of Donegal’s most iconic tourist locations.The many EIRE markers dotted around Ireland’s coastline are one of the lasting reminders of the local impact of World War II. The giant stone signs and numbers were laid out in the 1940s as a navigation aid for American bomber pilots. They also warned wartime airmen that they were flying over a neutral country.There are 14 impressive markers on the Donegal coastline and 83 nationally. However, as the decades go by, some signs have fallen victim to the elements. One such sign at Carrigan Head, near the Sliabh Liag viewing point, was barely visible to the eye.But a resourceful group of locals have started to restore the landmark to its former glory.EIRE 71 sign restoration at Sliabh Liag, 6th April 2019The nine volunteers from Teelin and Carrick took it upon themselves to work on the sign last Saturday. With just an old photograph as a guide, they removed the sod from the stones which, after 70 years, were almost all underground. The team plans to return again to clean and whitewash the rocks in the coming weeks.Ciaran McHugh, a member of the restoration team, said the project was born from locals taking an active pride in their area. “It all started as a bit of pub talk. We were tired of waiting on someone to fix the sign so we decided to do it ourselves,” Ciaran said.“It’s a lovely part of our heritage. When we were working last weekend there was umpteen tourists over asking what we were doing and it got a lot of attention.”EIRE 71 sign restoration at Sliabh Liag, 6th April 2019Mr McHugh said the restored marker will only add to the historic wonder of Sliabh Liag.“The signs really add to the area. You have the sea cliffs on one sign and this lovely sign. It’s local pride, it’s a beautiful part of Donegal and on the Wild Atlantic Way too,” he said.EIRE 71 sign restoration at Sliabh Liag, 6th April 2019Local pride inspires restoration of historic ÉIRE sign was last modified: April 8th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Communityeire signmarkersrestorationsliabh liagworld war twolast_img read more

first_imgOver €104,000 has been awarded to over 55 Donegal groups by SSE Airtricity as the Community Fund tops €1.1million since 2007.SSE Airtricity presented the money to community groups located close to Meentycat Wind Farm this week.In September, 45 community groups and bodies took part in Meentycat’s Community Fund Sponsored Walk. A record-breaking 1,200 community members walked through Meenycat and Culliagh Wind Farms near Ballybofey.With the sponsored walk now in its 12th year, community groups have benefitted from almost €781,000 to date.On Monday, the company presented €52,249 to local groups, topping-up the €80,000 raised by community members from this year’s Sponsored Walk.The following day, Tuesday, the firm awarded a further €53,000 for 11 local projects through its Community Fund. Both presentations took place in the Villa Rose Hotel in Ballybofey. Pictured are representative from the community groups who collected their cheques on Monday last in the Villa Rose Ballybofey front from left are Eugene Gallagher, Sean MacCumhaills, Seamus Herron, Service Manger SSE Airtricity, Anne Reynolds, SSE Airtricity Community Development Officer and Cora Harvey, Cappry Rovers. Back from left Brian Anderson, Twin Towns Boxing Club, Coulter Blackburn, Raphoe Congregational Church, Stephen Hasson, Illistrin Football Club, Sean Bonner, Glenfinn GAA, Ciaran Mac Ruaidhrí, Gairmscoil Chú Uladh, John Willie McNulty, Cappry Rovers, Ruth Blackburn, Raphoe Congregational, Sammy Devenney, St Ninians Convoy and Roy Kennedy, St. Ninians Convoy. Photo Clive WassonThis presentation will bring the total funds awarded to over €1.1 million between the Community Fund and Sponsored Walk.A large number of this year’s Community Fund recipients are putting the funding towards improving their energy efficiency measures, which SSE Airtricity strongly supports. Letterkenny Rugby Club and St. Ninians’s Convoy Parish Church will improve the insulation of their buildings, while Raphoe Congregational Church, Illistrin Football Club and Sean MacCumhaill CLG will upgrade the lighting for their premises. Twin Towns Boxing Club will upgrade their electric showers in the club. Gairmscoil Chu Uladh will upgrade their heating system for the school. CLG Ghleann Fhinne will undertake roof repairs and insulation for the clubhouse. Cappry Rovers will improve their astroturf facilities at the club. Elsewhere the Green Residents Group and Green Residents Admiran Group have received funding towards landscaping in their area.€104,000 awarded to over 55 Donegal groups near wind farm was last modified: December 11th, 2019 by Dionne MeehanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:AirtricityBallybofeyCommunity FunddonegalMeentycat and Culliagh Wind FarmSponsored walklast_img read more

first_imgLindsey Vonn couldn’t wiggle her fingers or move her wrist. Understandably, she wanted to be reassured everything would be OK.A crash during training had left her screaming, then passing out from the pain, on the side of a Colorado mountain, 15 months ahead of the Pyeongchang Olympics. Just one of a series of serious injuries that has interrupted the American’s illustrious ski career, this required delicate surgery to insert a plate and more than a dozen screws into her broken right arm while …last_img read more

first_imgWhy do we sleep? A new theory identifies a vital purpose for those seemingly lost hours.During the day, we all collect vast quantities of information through our senses. Not all of it is useful, but if we don’t condense it to essentials, memories can be like piles of clutter in a hoarder’s house.Evidence announced by New Scientist supports the “housekeeping” theory of sleep. Clare Wilson says that the “mystery of what sleep does to our brains may finally be solved.”It is one of life’s great enigmas: why do we sleep? Now we have the best evidence yet of what sleep is for – allowing housekeeping processes to take place that stop our brains becoming overloaded with new memories….Support is growing for a theory that sleep evolved so that connections in the brain can be pruned down during slumber, making room for fresh memories to form the next day. “Sleep is the price we pay for learning,” says Giulio Tononi of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who developed the idea.Experiments with rats showed smaller synapses after sleep, potentially allowing room for new memories. Other observations support the idea.If the housekeeping theory is right, it would explain why, when we miss a night’s sleep, the next day we find it harder to concentrate and learn new information – we may have less capacity to encode new experiences. The finding suggests that, as well as it being important to get a good night’s sleep after learning something, we should also try to sleep well the night before.It could also explain why, if our sleep is interrupted, we feel less refreshed the next day. There is some indirect evidence that deep, slow-wave sleep is best for pruning back synapses, and it takes time for our brains to reach this level of unconsciousness.It took 4 years of study to identify the brain tissue responding to sleep, Wilson says.The Creator thought of everything. Imagine! While your conscious mind is mostly off, your body’s night crew knows what to do and springs into action.Sleep is usually a pleasurable part of life, taking up nearly a third of our lifetimes. Enjoy it, but don’t over use it. “Love not sleep, lest you come to poverty,” Solomon warned. Give the housekeeping crew enough time to work but not to loaf. (Visited 38 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more