上海龙凤

first_imgYvonne Johnston is the Chief Executive Officer of the International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC), an organization which aims to create a positive, united image for South Africa to give the country a strategic advantage in an increasingly competitive marketplace. This it does through the promotion of Brand South Africa. Its mission – to articulate a brand for South Africa, which positions the country in order to attract tourism, trade and investment, as well as realise international relations objectives; to establish an integrated approach within government and the private sector towards the international marketing of South Africa and to build national support for Brand South Africa.Pivotal to the success of the work of the IMC is the realization of its mission as this will help the country deal with its socio-economic issues.The IMC has been in existence since 2000 and in her five years at the helm of the organisation, Yvonne is credited with raising the profile of Brand South Africa to the point where it was voted amongst the Top 5 Hot Brands for 2004 by Intelligence Total Business (formerly Business 2.0), an authoritative publication which offers information on next generation business trends, processes and insights.Another highlight was being selected as one of five finalists for the 2005 Business Woman of the Year.She is a widely respected as a leading communications strategist and has played a major role in the training and teaching of strategic media skills in the industry and is a much sought-after public speaker locally and abroad on Brands, as well as the current mood of our nation.Previously, she has worked in the Advertising and Marketing industry in a career spanning over 20 years as a Media Director of leading ad agencies.For 5 years she was Group Media Director of Ogilvy and Mather. This was followed by a stint in marketing, including running her own marketing consultancy, Refreshing Marketing, specializing in experiential marketing and Marketing to Women.She currently sits on the boards of SA Tourism, The African Hall of Fame and The Valued Citizens.last_img read more

first_img3 March 2015The Castle Lager Proteas produced the ideal performance both with bat and ball to beat Ireland by 201 runs in their ICC World Cup Pool B match at Canberra on Tuesday.The Proteas set a record for posting 400 runs totals in back-to-back matches and have now drawn level with India with five totals in excess of this milestone. They are also the second team after Australia to post 200-run wins in successive World Cup matches.The Proteas once again followed their blueprint of laying a solid foundation with Hashim Amla and Faf du Plessis sharing a South African second-wicket record stand of 247, beating the previous mark of 207 set by Gary Kirsten and Neil McKenzie against Kenya in 2001.Both men scored centuries – Amla getting his 20th and finishing with a career best (159 off 128 balls, 16 fours and 4 sixes); and Du Plessis his fourth best (109 off 109 balls, 10 fours and a six).Amla reached the milestone of 20 centuries far quicker than anybody else in the history of the game.By far the most important statistic, however, was the fact that the Proteas scored more than 200 runs (230) for the second match in a row in the final 20 overs. Everybody has been talking about getting 100 in the final 10 but the Proteas have now taken this to a new level with 100 runs in each of the last 10 overs.Once again, they constructed an excellent batting power play, following up their 72/0 against the West Indies between overs 36 and 40 with 69/1 against Ireland in the same grouping of overs.Equally impressive was the fact that they reached 400 with a negligible contribution from AB de Villiers, although he and Amla shared a stand of 40 in 2.3 overs.It was left to Rilee Rossouw and David Miller to finish the innings in style with an unbroken partnership of 110 in 8.3 overs. Rossouw contributed 61 (30 balls, 6 fours and 3 sixes), and Miller 46 off 23 (4 fours and 2 sixes).The pace trio then virtually settled the game in the 10 overs statutory power play, taking four wickets between them, allowing De Villiers the luxury of experimenting with his part-time bowling options. He himself bowled two overs, Du Plessis four and Rossouw two and, together with Farhaan Behardien’s two, this amounted to the fifth bowler taking 1/63 between them.This was the only stage at which the Irish batsmen were able to get into the game with Andy Ballbirnie and Kevin O’Brien sharing a stand of 81 in 15.3 overs for the sixth wicket.Kyle Abbott, like Rossouw, continues to present an impelling case for a starting berth in a full-strength XI while Dale Steyn celebrated his 100th ODI in emphatic style. The more he bowls, the better he will get and he is honing in nicely for the knock-out stage of the competition.The Proteas are in second place in Pool B behind India with a positive net run rate of almost 2.South Africa now return to New Zealand for their next match against Pakistan at Auckland on Saturday, 3am South African time.WORLD CUP MATCHESGroup matches15 February, 3am: South Africa beat Zimbabwe.22 February, 5.30am: India beat South Africa.27 February, 5.30am: South beat West Indies.3 March, 5.30am: South Africa beat Ireland.7 March, 3am: South Africa v Pakistan. Eden Park, Auckland12 March, 3am: South Africa v United Arab Emirates. Westpac Stadium, WellingtonQuaterfinals18 March, 5.30am: Sydney Cricket Ground19 March, 5.30am: Melbourne Cricket Ground20 March, 5.30am: Adelaide Oval21 March, 3am: Westpac Stadium, WellingtonSemifinals24 March, 3am: Eden Park, Auckland26 March, 5.30am: Sydney Cricket GroundFinal29 March, 5.30am: Melbourne Cricket GroundCricket South Africalast_img read more

first_img​Guardiola insists Man City not ready to win Champions Leagueby Freddie Taylor4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola thinks his team is still not ready to win the Champions League.It is no secret that two-times defending Premier League champions City want to win Europe’s biggest club competition.But they have failed in the early knockout rounds for several seasons in a row.And Guardiola believes their profligacy in front of goal will cost them in Champions League matches.”We miss a lot of chances in the final third [during a 2-0 win at Crystal Palace on Saturday] and we have to do that to be clinical. When the people say about the Champions League being the target, we are still not ready,” he told reporters.”We create a lot and we don’t concede, but we can still improve. We are a team in the last two seasons who score a lot and create a lot. I don’t have doubt about that, but still we have to keep going and work on that.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgOregon's fans celebrate during the Pac-12 title game against Arizona.SANTA CLARA, CA – DECEMBER 05: Oregon Ducks fans celebrate an impending victory against the Arizona Wildcats during the PAC-12 Championships at Levi’s Stadium on December 5, 2014 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)For some Oregon fans, last week’s loss in the College Football Playoff National Championship hurt a bit more than it did for others. One Ducks supporter, who made a bet on the game with his buddy, had to endure physical pain as a result of the Buckeyes’ victory.The fan in question, who made it clear that he still supports Oregon, was forced to get a huge Ohio State tattoo on his thigh. His friend posted a photo of the new ink, and he himself posted a sad face emoji.LADIES AND GENTLEMAN. HERE IS THE TATTOO. A man of his word @Debellonia88 pic.twitter.com/HWUah8BL5D— H (@Hlee3D) January 21, 2015— Sun Duck (@Debellonia88) January 21, 2015If the two schools ever meet in the playoff again, you can guarantee this guy will be looking to double down on his wager.[Deadspin]last_img read more

first_imgThe former Senator and Minister of Government, Hon. Carlyle Dunkley, has been accorded an official funeral by the Government.The Service of Thanksgiving will take place at the University Chapel, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, on Wednesday (July 5), commencing at 10:00 a.m.Mr. Dunkley, who died on June 21, served Jamaica for more than 40 years in various posts and was a former Ambassador to Cuba and Special Envoy to CARICOM and the Association of Caribbean States.He held the positions of Cabinet Minister, Deputy President of the Senate and former President of the National Workers Union (NWU).Mr. Dunkley served as Senator from 1972 to 1978 and 1980 to 1983; Minister of Public Utilities and Transport, 1979 to 1980; Lecturer, University of the West Indies (UWI), 1982 to 1989; Spokesman on Education, 1984 to 1989; Minister of Education, 1989 to 1991; and Minister of Production, Mining and Commerce, 1992.He also served as Island Supervisor of the NWU in 1972, and later as President of the Union in 1977.last_img read more

World Cup Crib Notes Day 6

The 2014 World Cup’s host country returns to action Tuesday, but we’ll be watching another game, in search of wunderkinds.Belgium vs. Algeria: 12 p.m. EDTBrazil vs. Mexico: 3 p.m. EDTRussia vs. South Korea: 6 p.m. EDTIN BRIEFSee our World Cup interactive for the latest probabilities.IN DEPTHBefore we get into why Belgium and Algeria is our game to watch, we should note that we cheated a bit in our criteria for Tuesday’s pick. Typically we’ve taken the greatest harmonic mean between competing teams’ SPI scores, which — as of Monday night — would have put the Brazil versus Mexico match atop the list at 82.4. But we’ve already seen both Brazil and Mexico play in this tournament and their matchup is one-sided, with Brazil having an 86 percent chance of winning (Mexico’s is 3 percent). So instead we’ve chosen to watch one of this year’s dark horses, Belgium, in its tournament debut.Belgium currently has the eighth-best chance of winning this year’s tournament (a mere 1 percent chance, but still). It’s the only team in SPI’s top 10 that hasn’t played yet. Its opponent, Algeria, on the other hand, has the lowest SPI of any team in the tournament and likewise a less than 1 percent chance of winning it all. But we think Tuesday’s matchup will be much closer than anticipated — the projected goal differential between the two teams is only 1.2, compared to 2.6 in the Brazil and Mexico match.But what’s most exciting about Belgium (which returns to the World Cup after failing to qualify for the last two tournaments) is its youth: 23-year-old Chelsea midfielder Eden Hazard, 21-year-old Everton striker Romelu Lukaku, 22-year-old Wolfsburg midfielder Kevin De Bruyne and 19-year-old Manchester United midfielder Adnan Januzaj all have dazzled in the top leagues in Europe but have yet to play on the World Cup stage. Both Belgium and Algeria feature rosters with 10 players under the age of 25, but Belgium’s youngsters are some of international soccer’s most talented. Hazard averaged 0.4 goals per game with Chelsea this year, and Lukaku averaged 0.45 for Everton.Many analysts discount Belgium’s talent after it breezed through qualifiers against teams like Macedonia and Scotland, so Tuesday’s matchup against Algeria will be the first time we see what these kids are really capable of.YESTERDAYThird time’s a charm. The United States entered Monday’s match against Ghana aiming to avoid becoming the first country to lose to the same opponent in three consecutive World Cups.Punctuated by a quick Clint Dempsey goal, the U.S. had the best of the first 10 minutes, with 66 touches to Ghana’s 52, including a 30-13 advantage in the attacking half. But from the 11th minute onward, not so much. The final score — 2-1 United States — didn’t reflect it, but the U.S. spent most of the game on its heels.Here’s a couple stats:The U.S. ended the match with 88 touches in the defending penalty area, the most by any team thus far in the World Cup. U.S. Goalie Tim Howard ended as the team’s leader in touches with 61, as well as pass attempts with 49. The U.S. recorded 45 clearances as a team. It’s the most by any team in a World Cup match since at least the start of the 1966 World Cup, as far back as ESPN Stats & Info’s data set goes.It was defender John Brooks, making his U.S. men’s national team debut, who scored the winning goal in the 86th minute, becoming the first substitute to score a goal for the U.S. in the World Cup. (At 21 years, 139 days old, Brooks is also the youngest player to score in this year’s tournament.)In the first match of the day, Germany became the first country to play in 100 World Cup matches, and in its 4-0 dismantling of Portugal was the first nation to score at least four goals in four straight openers.Germany had a slight possession advantage over Portugal, amassing 684 touches to Portugal’s 556, but had a big advantage where it counted; Germany had 24 touches in in the attacking penalty area compared to Portugal’s eight. Mario Gotze had more touches (nine) in the attacking penalty area than the entire Portuguese team. Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo managed just one touch in the attacking penalty area.The star of the match was Germany’s Thomas Müller, who had his country’s first World Cup hat trick since Miroslav Klose in 2002. Müller made the most of his seven touches in the attacking penalty area, scoring on each of his three shots on target. — Jacob Nitzberg, statistics analyst, ESPNOFF THE PITCHAlgeria versus Belgium is the most mismatched pairing in Group H, with a 65 percent chance of Belgium winning and just a 12 percent chance that Algeria will claim victory. And this imbalance is no less true in the countries’ trade relationship, at least as far as diversity goes. According to OECD data, Belgian exports to Algeria in 2011 totaled $2.06 billion spread over a wide range of categories — the plurality of which were cars and car parts at 22 percent, closely followed by preserved milk at 21 percent. But flip the relationship around, and a whopping 92 percent of Algeria’s $3.45 billion in exports to Belgium consisted of crude petroleum.Mexico and Brazil, on the other hand, have a much more symmetrical trade relationship. On both sides, a majority of the exports was some type of machinery, which made up about 53 percent of Brazil’s exports (a well-spread mix of everything from cars to sewing machinery) and 58 percent of Mexico’s (of which cars made up a 46 percent plurality).Russia and Korea are another evenly matched trade duo, and the sectors even complement each other. Korea’s biggest export to Russia was machinery (mostly cars and car parts) at 55 percent, while Russia’s was — surprise, surprise — oil, at 60 percent. — Hayley MunguiaFURTHER READINGThe U.S. Now Has a Better Shot at the World Cup, But Still Needs a Point Against PortugalWhy Isn’t the U.S. Men’s National Team Better at Soccer?A World Cup Fan’s Guide to Accepting Refereeing Decisions in Your FavorU.S. Soccer Fandom: The Investigation Continues read more

US vs Belgium Was the Best Match of the World Cup So

To the left are the factors I used and the weights I assigned each.Some things don’t matter in my book. I don’t take into account our prematch ratings of each team. A Bayesian would figure that the better teams are more likely to play better soccer, but in a tournament that has seen favorites dominate the later stages, I don’t want to give them any other advantages.Also, while knockout matches get a boost because they’re considered more meaningful than group-stage matches, I also don’t give any extra credit for knockout games that are tied after 90 minutes. Part of the beauty of soccer is that matches take a predictable, and brief, amount of time. So all stats are normalized to a 90-minute match, and penalty kicks don’t factor in. Relatedly, I have no bias for or against draws. Either they come in the group stage and are critical to standings, or they’re in the knockout stage and are settled by penalty kicks.I didn’t merely add together these numbers. A typical match had 725 completed passes per 90 minutes, but just 2.65 goals per 90 minutes. Plus, some of the measures were expressed in percentages. So I used standard scores, aka Z scores: the number of standard deviations each measure was from the mean. Each match’s final score was the weighted sum of Z scores for each measure.And here are the Top 10 and bottom 10 matches, according to my method:Belgium-U.S. did well across the categories. It was meaningful and close for all but the two minutes between the second Belgium goal and the lone U.S. goal. It had lots of one-on-ones, chances and expected assists; and few offsides, bookings and major errors.In other words, it was the mirror image of the dreadful France defeat of Honduras. France led comfortably for nearly all of the second half. The match had few one-on-ones, a relatively low proportion of shots that were on goal, few chances or assists, and an own goal by Noel Valladares, the Honduras goalkeeper.While I’m comfortable with both of these choices, I was surprised to see the two semis in my top 10. Germany’s rout of Brazil wasn’t competitive after the first 20 minutes, but the German attack’s efficiency and pinpoint passing made it look like a classic anyway. (It also had few fouls, bookings and offsides calls.) And it did have a certain car-wreck quality that made it highly watchable. Argentina’s penalty-kick ouster of the Netherlands was highly meaningful and close throughout, with accurate passing. That helped it overcome the lack of goals and, especially, chances — the fewest per 90 minutes of any match so far.The rankings also make me want to watch replays of Nigeria — which had two top-five matches — and they provide a parting insult to Spain, which played two matches in the bottom 10. They also highlight the drama of the Round of 16, which had three of the top nine matches.Just to show how much my preferences matter, I tested a few small changes in the weightings and came up with different results. Weight goals per 90 minutes by four instead of one, and Germany-Brazil is the best match of the World Cup in addition to the most surprising. Or shift the weight on successful tackle percentage to four, and Germany-Algeria takes the prize. (No simple tweak, though, can rescue France-Honduras.)As these examples demonstrate, this ranking, like any other, is arbitrary. The factors I included and the weights I chose were based on what data I had available and my preferences. Let me know in the comments how you’d rank the matches, or rank them yourselves. There are lots of stats available at FIFA.com and Whoscored.com. I thought it’d be fun to try to devise a way to rank the 62 World Cup matches played through Wednesday for sheer entertainment value. After all, most people in the world entered the tournament without their home country to support. And many people who live in one of the 32 nations with a contender have seen their country’s team knocked out and had to choose whether to adopt a new side to support, or to simply cheer for good, exciting soccer — or, in other words, what was absent from France-Honduras, the worst match by my measure.So, what defines good, exciting soccer? What sets Belgium 2-U.S. 1, the best match of the tournament by my ranking, apart from France 3-Honduras 0, the worst? Anyone who thinks about the question probably would answer it a little differently. Here are my answers: A match needs to matter. Knockout matches matter the most, while the third of the three group-stage matches sometimes matter much less, particularly when the two teams have been eliminated from the knockout stage already.A match needs to be close for most of the time. It can end 4-0, so long as it was 1-0 until the final minutes.All else equal, a match with more goals is more fun than one with fewer goals. But not all goals are created equal. Goals caused by opponent errors aren’t the result of good play, so each one is as bad as other goals are good. I prefer assisted goals, so they get a 50 percent boost.Whatever the final score, a match will be more entertaining if it has more chances. And meaningful chances matter more. So a better match will have a greater number of expected goals and assists. Our expectation is based on the location of shots and passes — and a model built by TruMedia to estimate the expected number of goals and assists based on these shots and passes and how they’re coded by Opta’s match analysts (TruMedia supplied the Opta data for this exercise). Good chances are entertaining whether or not they lead to goals: When they don’t, a defender or goalkeeper is probably partially responsible. But missed shots are no fun and a sign of bad play. So the higher the percentage of all those shots that aren’t blocked by the defense that are on target, the better.One-on-one showdowns between an offensive player and a defensive counterpart are exciting. The more of these, the better.The greater the number of completed passes, the more the ball is moving and teammates are collaborating. Incomplete passes could be the result of ambitious passing, of bad touches or of good defense, so I ignore them.Tackles are good, but missed tackles aren’t. So the higher the percentage of attempted tackles that are successful, the better.Flowing play is better than lots of referee whistles. So the fewer fouls, the fewer bookings and the fewer offsides calls, the better.There aren’t many stats that directly measure errors, so I use one of those — misplays on crosses by goalkeepers — along with own goals and goals caused by defensive errors as a proxy for sloppy play in meaningful moments. read more

Ohio State redshirt senior defensive end Nathan Williams trailed behind the pack of scarlet and gray-clad Buckeyes players as the team rushed onto the field for the opening game of the 2012 season. Williams said he was savoring the cheers of the 105,039 fans in attendance Saturday at Ohio Stadium for the No. 18 Buckeyes’ game against the Miami (Ohio) RedHawks. It was Williams’ first chance to make the dash onto the field since OSU’s Sept. 3, 2011, home opener against the Akron Zips, which he exited with an injury that would eventually require season-ending microfracture surgery to repair his injured knee. In the year that followed the game against Akron, Williams’ life has consisted mostly of rehab and icing his injured left knee. Football, Williams said, was a job he loved to get up in the morning for, and it was taken from him last September. “For so many months, I was down and out,” Williams said, “and on a machine and icing. Countless ice bags I’ve made.” Projected by several OSU coaches to play between eight and 10 snaps in his return against the RedHawks, Williams reclaimed his livelihood in surprising fashion – he started, was on the field for about 30 plays and made two solo tackles in OSU’s 56-10 win. “It means a lot. I’m at a loss for words,” Williams said following his return. “I’m happy that the coaches believe in me and that these players have stuck by my side and Buckeye Nation stuck by my side. I appreciate everyone for that.” First-year OSU coach Urban Meyer was noncommittal about Williams’ status for Saturday’s game until Tuesday when the player passed tests in practice to get into the game. After beating the RedHawks, Meyer said Williams played more than he expected and lauded his performance. “I love Nate. I love the fact that he is a warrior, that he loves Ohio State. That he’s doing the best he can,” Meyer said. “And I like the fact that (Williams’ position coaches) had enough confidence to get him in the game.” It was more of the same from OSU co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell, who said he wanted to ease Williams back into the flow of the game by limiting his time on the field. That plan changed after watching Williams get loose before kickoff, Fickell said, adding he could tell Williams had a chance to really make an impact. That intuition was realized by game’s end. “You see what kind of competitor he is,” Fickell said after the game. “From what I saw, he looked pretty good.” There’s still work to be done – Williams knows that. He failed to convince himself that he was the same player that tallied 92 tackles, 26 tackles for loss and 11 sacks prior to the surgery that ended his 2011 season. On Miami’s first drive of the game, Williams missed a chance to sack RedHawks senior quarterback Zac Dysert, a player Meyer said has NFL potential. “If I would have got (Dysert), I would have considered that I’m back,” Williams said. “I’m kind of upset that I didn’t. My glove kind of slipped over top of him. There ain’t gonna be no more of that.” Williams said he saw an opportunity on the play and went for it, but defensive line coach Mike Vrabel disagreed during a Monday interview at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center, saying there was no opportunity because Williams didn’t do his job. Perhaps evidence of lingering rust, Williams incorrectly abandoned his assignment to cover a Miami running back on the play, Vrabel said. However, Vrabel’s remarks came across as playful chides at Williams – he and members of the media laughed while delivering his criticisms with a smile. Vrabel said he was among those that were just glad Williams was a productive member of the team again. “Nathan, God love him, he can tell you whatever he wants,” Vrabel said. “I’m happy he was out there. He had some energy. He had some enthusiasm. (He) played with some toughness and, you know, I think it was a big confidence builder for him to be out there. He was pumped. He was excited that he could do it.” Considering the long hours of rehab and bagging ice cubes to tape to his surgically repaired knee, pumped might be an understatement. “Unparalleled” and “a dream come true” were the words Williams used to describe his feelings. “Getting another chance to be in this stadium and play for you guys – I wake up every morning looking forward to go to work just to make you guys happy,” he said, “so I’m not going to take it for granted.” OSU returns to action Saturday at Ohio Stadium with a game against Central Florida scheduled for noon. read more

Ohio State coach Kevin McGuff upset on the sideline during the Big Ten tournament semifinal game against Purdue. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Sports DirectorINDIANAPOLIS — Top seeded Ohio State lost in the Big Ten Women’s Basketball Tournament semifinals to No. 5 Purdue 71-60, ending their 12 game winning streak. The Buckeyes were lost without leading scorer, junior guard Kelsey Mitchell, taking over the game. The Boilermakers held the Big Ten Player of the Year to only nine points on 3 for 22 shooting and 1 for 12 from deep. Senior forward Shayla Cooper ended her last Big Ten tournament career recording a double-double and leading the team with 14 points, 10 rebounds, and four assists.“I thought we played hard, we just didn’t play well,” said OSU coach Kevin McGuff.Purdue was led by Ashley Morrissette with 24 points, three rebounds, and seven assists. She was followed by freshman Dominique Oden with 20 points and hit half of her shots from the field and all of her shots from the charity stripe. The first quarter was a back-and-forth battle between the Boilermakers and Buckeyes. OSU hit 52.6 percent from the field in the first quarter, but Purdue held its own, shooting 41.7 percent and going 8 for 8 at the charity stripe. With the buzzer at the first, OSU only held a two-point lead, 22-20.OSU was unable to find their touch in the second quarter. The Boilermakers went to a 2-3 zone and took away the Buckeyes range, rotating out on the Buckeyes quickly as OSU went 0 for 6 from 3-point range.“We didn’t hit many shots,” McGuff said. “Part of that had to do with their defense. They’re were really effective.”Purdue slowed down Mitchell, forcing her to take ill-advised shots and limiting her to just 2 for 12 from the field in the half. Purdue also dominated the boards throughout the first half, out rebounding OSU 25-17. Purdue lead OSU 36-31 at half.Purdue opened the second half with two quick scores from Oden and Morrissette, giving the Boilermakers their first double-digit lead. OSU started to make some shots and cut the lead back to single digits near the end of the third, but the Boilermakers fought back with more contributions from Oden and Morrissette. The quarter ended with Purdue maintaining their double-digit lead 55-42.Throughout the final quarter of play the Buckeyes played with urgency, but were unable to find their way as Mitchell continued to struggle, hitting only one shot in the second half. Ultimately, OSU never found their shot and Purdue capitalized off of the Buckeyes off-night.“(Morrissette’s) a player,” Cooper said. “She’s a great player, but we had to dig in a little more on the defensive side.”The Buckeyes will continue their tournament play into the NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament, which begins in less than two weeks. The NCAA Women’s Basketball selection show will reveal the fate of OSU on March 13 at 7 p.m.Nicholas McWilliams contributed quotes from Indianapolis. read more