June 2021

first_img If ever an 80-minute performance epitomised a club – its values, ethos and ingrained traditions – it was Leicester Tigers’ 26-21 defeat of Wasps at the Ricoh Arena on Saturday.Bloody-mindedness, tenacity and perseverance are essential attributes for anyone rocking up in the East Midlands. You do not last too many arduous Oval Park training sessions without a blend of all three.Put simply, those qualities yield results. When things click, comfortable victories come. Even when passes will not stick and an encounter becomes a dogfight, the side often scrapes to triumph. The common denominator is winning.For so much of this season, Tigers’ displays have sat somewhere between disjointed and downright poor. Their tally of 35 tries is superior only to relegated London Welsh. Just five teams possess an inferior points difference.But innate stubbornness and visceral graft have proved mightily effective. Richard Cockerill’s men arrived in Coventry – along with a healthy third of the 32,000 sell-out – with their play-off destiny in their own hands.And, despite a red card for Seremaia Bai four minutes before half-time, the hosts – arguably the most exciting attackers in the division – could not prise Leicester’s title hopes out of an iron grasp.Cockerill’s passions perennially press against surface tension. He lived every second of a compelling game and was blinking back tears when Wayne Barnes blew the final whistle.Poignantly, as a scrum was re-set in the last minute, he growled: “This is the moment we train for. This is it.” Tigers actually conceded a penalty, but the sentiment held firm. Not since 2004 have they failed to make a Premiership semi-final.Leicester went a way towards galvanising their rich history at the weekend. Here is how they ground it out.1. Timely scrum superiority The collective guts and backs-to-the-wall mentality on show made it rather tough to single out any one Tiger, but Dan Cole was outstanding at tighthead. Stuart Lancaster defines the term ‘world class’ as one of the top three on the planet in any given position. It is difficult to argue against Cole meriting such a moniker.Anyway, here are three set-pieces that swung momentum towards Leicester. First up, watch Cole squeeze an infringement out of the excellent Matt Mullan at the opening scrum:There are two tell-tale signs that Wasps are struggling to contain Tigers here. The posture of Lorenzo Cittadini is one. Opposite the strength of Logovi’i Mulipola, the Italian has straightened his legs, bracing rather than shuffling backwards:Next, just before the scrum collapses, we can see the binding of hooker Carlo Festuccia break:This comes as a result of Cole piling through. Though Mullan was pinpointed by the touch-judge, all three of the Wasps front row were in trouble. Leicester kicked to touch and scored from good field position.Tigers have made a habit of eking out penalties on their own put-in. However, in the second half, there was an example of their prowess on opposition ball:On the back of a long period soaking up Wasps runners, this play from Julian Salvi hauled Leicester back onto the front foot. It is an archetypal piece of openside opportunism. As the scrum wheels, he sees Nathan Hughes release his bind to pick up the ball in his left hand:Of course, this ends the set-piece and eradicates an offside line, so Salvi can swoop. The Australian does so, forcing a knock-on:Cole and co. then decimate the ensuing scrum to garner another penalty:Holding a precarious 21-15 advantage at this stage, Tigers needed this effort to complement their physicality and hard-edged endeavours elsewhere.2. Commanding the gain-line There was a marked difference when the respective teams attacked on Saturday. Wasps were largely lateral – which we will come onto later – while Leicester were direct, figures like Mulipola careering into contact.Early on, this sequence between Jordan Crane, Brad Thorn and the Youngs brothers, Ben and Tom, brought them from the 22 over halfway and illustrates how effective Tigers were at close quarters, winning collisions to break the advantage line:There was no let-up in intensity when Wasps did come at Tigers on narrow angles around the ruck. Nowhere was this better demonstrated than on the final play of the game, as James Haskell went hard into midfield off the shoulder of replacement fly-half Alex Lozowski:Marcos Ayerza is the man to make the match-clinching hit. The Argentinian spots the runner from his position as part of a well-drilled defensive line……and closes down the space before hurling himself into an awesome impact in a copybook body position to force the ball loose:Such an abrasive attitude extended to Tigers’ phase-play.3. Uncompromising continuityAs well as putting their bodies on the line in tackles and carries, the visitors were relentless at the ruck. The build-up to Vereniki Goneva‘s try, Leicester’s second, was a flawless example of muscular support play.From a lineout on the Wasps 22, they were brutally efficient, smashing anyone to engage with the breakdown to the floor – and therefore out of the game. We catch up as Cole rumbles forward:Following up, Jamie Gibson takes out Haskell……before Graham Kitchener deals with James Gaskell:The pattern continued. Crane is the next to truck it up off Ben Youngs:Again, Haskell threatens the ball and again he is taken out, this time by Tom Youngs: An absorbing victory over Wasps at the Ricoh Arena means Leicester Tigers are within touching distance of the play-offs. Here’s how they did it. TAGS: Leicester TigersWasps LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Turning towards referee Barnes, the Wasps skipper is clearly frustrated, feeling that Tigers are unduly obstructing him and his teammates. Barnes replied, the ref mic picking up: “I can’t penalise them for clearing you out.”So the robust practice continued as Bai barrelled close to the line:Notice that Cole steps in to dispose of Ashley Johnson:This paved the way for a lovely transfer from Freddie Burns to free Goneva:Leicester were so clinical with their finishing, chalking up three tries to none. Their execution at the attacking breakdown was mirrored in defence.4. Defensive breakdown  – spoiling and stealingBurns kicked Tigers’ first points from a penalty that set the tone for the match after Andrea Masi infringed:Salvi is the focal man here and is cleverly positioned wide from the lineout to lead the chase of Burns’ fine clearance:He makes the tackle, bounces to his feet and (although fortunate not to give a penalty away for not supporting his bodyweight) leads a counter-ruck:Masi throws the ball back towards his colleagues and is pinged.Salvi led Leicester in a dominant breakdown display, securing another penalty later as Haskell held on under a classic jackal:But just as central to Tigers’ triumph were the subtleties that slowed down Wasps ball.Gibson, who is heading to Northampton Saints next season in what might easily be the signing of the season, is a master of this.Watch how the speed of Wasps’ phase-play is sapped here after Gibson downs Masi and, alongside Salvi, makes himself difficult to budge:Another supreme piece of prickly spoiling to finish. Needing a try to remain in the title chase as the clock wound down, Wasps required precision. Pristine ruck ball would have helped.Attempting to run it out of their own half, the last thing they want is for Cole to send a big boot into the tackle area, causing a ricochet that fell kindly into Tiger paws:The action underlined a collective desire to impose themselves awkwardly on Wasps and adopt the role of bullies for an afternoon. That they dealt with a red card and still did so was remarkable.5. Trust and red card reorganisationAs we have already seen, Leicester stood firm and pressed when Wasps took a narrow tack. When Dai Young‘s side went wide to their dangermen Daly and Christian Wade though, the Tigers drift was exceptional. No wonder defence coach Phil Blake was ecstatic afterwards.In this instance, Alapati Leuia has broken free to get behind Leicester. There is space on the right, but a calm, cohesive slide stops the danger:Slowing their pace, showing Wasps their outside shoulders and using the touchline as a teammate, Tigers execute this perfectly.They did not switch off inside the ball either. Mathew Tait defended wonderfully all day and it is he who makes the last interception. From this screengrab, we can see how far across he gets:When Bai received his marching orders, Leicester lost a teak-tough physical specimen in midfield and a breakdown menace. Even so, they coped manfully.From the resultant penalty, Wasps went wide to attack their one-man advantage immediately. Watch how Tait and Goneva work together. They concede ground, but that is not a problem.Tait tracks across to get Daly before Goneva strips the ball from Wade as he steps inside:Of course, with Goneva moved into the centres, just Niall Morris and Adam Thompstone were left in the back field. The pendulum system of covering kicks became a two-man job.With Morris up in the primary line, this clever grubber from Andy Goode so nearly unlocked Leicester. However, Thompstone had his buddy’s back:A reverse angle shows the vast distance Thompstone must cover to beat Daly to the ball:Such industry summed up the clash.Wasps’ decision to play Tom Jones tune ‘What’s New Pussycat?’ as Tigers took the field backfired. Leicester Tigers could not have reinforced their identity more vigorously.An East Midlands derby remains at Welford Road. Thanks to Exeter Chiefs‘ dramatic conquering of Allianz Park, Tigers need to win. It represents a tough ask, but – even if adversity descends once more – they will feel right at home.Thanks to BT Sport and Premiership Rugby for the match footage. You can purchase tickets to the Aviva Premiership final at Twickenham here. Samoan steam train : Logovi’i Mulipola on the charge for Leicester Tigers last_img read more

first_imgWhoever wins Pool D is likely to face the Pumas in the World Cup quarter-finals – and both France and Ireland know how tough that task is Running the show: Nicolas Sanchez breaks through Georgia’s defence. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The All Blacks. That’s who the runners-up of Pool D face in Cardiff on 17 October. The thought has been in the back of the minds of Irish and French fans for months, both sets of supporters conscious that the prize for winning their group is a World Cup quarter-final against Argentina. ‘Prize?’ Some prize.Two matches into their World Cup campaign and the Pumas are looking ominous. They ran New Zealand close in their opening match, eventually losing 26-16 as the All Blacks found an extra gear in the final quarter thanks to their stronger bench, and they then demolished Georgia 54-9 in Gloucester last Friday.In running in seven tries against the Georgians, the Pumas proved they are more than just their traditionally big scrummaging pack. Juan Martin Hernandez is showing signs of the form he displayed eight years ago, when Argentina finished third in the World Cup, while Tomas Cubelli and Nicolas Sanchez are a half-pack pairing of quality and control. Sanchez has the ability to pinch points whenever they are on offer, and against Georgia he scored the first drop-goal of the World Cup, a skill of his that France know all about.When the two sides met in Paris last November, Sanchez dropped three goals (Hernandez managed a fourth) and kicked two penalities in the Pumas’ 18-13 victory. Mind you, Sanchez was playing behind a pack that day that dominated their opponents, despite the fact Argentina were without veteran back-rowers Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe and Juan Manuel Leguizamon. But they did have Tomas Lavanini, the 6ft 7in 22-year-old lock who, judging by his performances so far this World Cup, is destined for greatness.Good move: Tomas Cubelli attacks during Argentina’s win over France last November. Photo: AFPFrance and Ireland will not relish the prospect of facing Argentina, particularly the French who have have lost nine of their last 15 Tests against the South Americans. Two of those losses occured in the 2007 World Cup, in their opening group game and in the third-place match, and the Pumas believe they have the beating of France this tournament.In last November’s match they were smarter than France, especially in defence where they did their homework on fly-half Camille Lopez. They were up so quickly on the Clermont No 10 that they cut down his passing options, forcing him to put boot to ball. But they knew his preference for kicking cross-field and the Argentinine back three were waiting. The result was that Lopez, so impressive a week earlier in France’s win against Australia, was unable to exert much influence on the match.Ireland’s World Cup record against Argentina is not much better. They were knocked out of the 1999 World Cup by the Pumas, scrapped a 16-15 win in Adelaide four years later and were hammered 30-15 in 2007, a match in which Hernandez lived up to his nickname of ‘El Mago’ (The Magician). “They controlled it well in fairness,” lamented Brian O’Driscoll after the defeat. “They are difficult to play against.”center_img Given that France have twice shocked New Zealand in World Cups, perhaps drawing the All Blacks in the last eight wouldn’t be the end of the world for les Bleus.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. They still are, as they showed against New Zealand and as they demonstrated last month in beating South Africa 37-25 in Durban, a victory that validated the decision to bring them into the Rugby Championship.Key role: Diego Albanese scoring the winning try against Ireland at RWC 1999. Photo: Getty ImagesThat honour was accorded on the back of their 2007 World Cup campaign and there’s a growing sense in Argentina that the 2015 side can at the very least emulate their predecessors. “If they stay focused and don’t have any serious injuries, I think the Pumas can go all the way,” says Diego Albanese, who played for the Pumas in three World Cups and is now a rugby analyst for ESPN Argentina.Albanese was a gifted wing, who scored ten tries in his 55 internationals, but when he made his debut for Argentina in 1995 it was in a team that tended to play to its forward strengths. That’s now changed and Albanese says the Rugby Championship is responsible. “Four years’ experience of playing the best the teams in the word regulary has given them confidence, self-belief and got them used to playing at a higher speed,” he explains.Albanese also cites the role of head coach Daniel Hourcade as a factor in Argentina’s fresh approach. Appointed in October 2013, Hourcade had coached the Argentine Development side and unlike France coach Philippe Saint-André he has never had any reservations in blooding young but inexperienced players. “Under Hourcade, their mindset is to attack and play with ball in hand,” says Albanese. “They have been working a lot in core skills, from the props to the wingers because they realised that in order to improve their game, they had to be much better in their basic skills, and you can see that today in the way they are playing.”Making his point: Philippe Saint-Andre knows how tough playing Argentina is. Photo: Getty ImagesAlbanese would prefer Argentina to play France in the quarter-final because he believes Ireland’s half-backs are world-class and their defence better organised. As for Hourcade, he didn’t seem unduly worried last November at the prospect of facing France. “Maybe we’ll see each again in the World Cup quarter-final?” he joked to French reporters, as he left the post-match press conference.last_img read more

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Omaha, Nebraska, puede no ser el lugar que algunos imaginen como el suelo fértil para que las tres fes abrahámicas encuentren un terreno común, pero la visión de esa coexistencia pacífica ha dado un paso significativo en el camino de convertirse en realidad.La Iniciativa de las Tres Fes de Omaha anunció el 13 de diciembre que había concluido la compra de cuatro parcelas adyacentes de tierra, que en su totalidad suman unas 14 hectáreas de un antiguo campo de golf en el centro de Omaha. El terreno se convertirá en Sterling Ridge, un proyecto que también incluirá casas unifamiliares, una instalación de vivienda asistida, así como espacio para oficinas, tiendas y un hotel.Tres Fes es un consorcio del Templo Israel, la Diócesis Episcopal de Nebraska y el Instituto Americano de Estudios y Cultura Islámicos, lo que Tres Fes llama “un barrio de colaboración multirreligiosa” que incluirá una sinagoga, una mezquita y una iglesia episcopal junto con un centro ecuménico.Cada grupo posee una parte de las 14 hectáreas, según un comunicado de prensa de Tres Fes.The Omaha World-Herald informó que Templo Israel es dueño de 5 hectáreas, en tanto la mezquita, la iglesia y el centro ecuménico son los propietarios de poco más de 1,5 hectáreas cada uno. El resto del terreno son áreas verdes, incluido un riachuelo, que se llama Hell Creek [Arroyo del Infierno].Cada grupo dijo haber pagado alrededor de $4 por pie cuadrado, lo cual sería unos $430.000 por hectárea, informaba el periódico. Todas las comunidades de las tres fes han contratado arquitectos y los primeros edificios se espera que estén terminados en 2013, dio a conocer Tres Fes en un comunicado de prensa.El Rdo. Tim Anderson, canónigo diocesano para el Ministerio de las Tres Fes, dijo en un parte de prensa que la comunidad episcopal que asistirá al culto en el lugar ya se ha organizado con el nombre de Ministerio Episcopal de las Tres Fes. La comunidad terminará por escoger un nombre que “nos identifique claramente como una iglesia cristiana, haga que personas de todas las denominaciones se sientan bienvenidas y refleje nuestro compromiso con la obra interreligiosa”.La comunidad comenzó a reunirse para los oficios de Cuaresma los domingos por la noche en la iglesia de San Agustín de Cantórbery [St. Augustine of Canterbury Church] en Elkhorn, Nebraska, donde la reunión se dividía en lo que Anderson dijo que era “la Primera Mesa” y “la Segunda Mesa”. La Primera Mesa es la Eucaristía y la Segunda Mesa es un tiempo dedicado a una comida ligera y una discusión, que con frecuencia se centra en la comprensión de otras fes. “Por lo regular tenemos a miembros de las comunidades judía e islámica que se aparecen y participan en las conversaciones”, abundó Anderson.La Obispa Primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, se refirió a la Iniciativa de las Tres Fes como “uno de los ejemplos más notables de lo que es posible hacer cuando hermanos y hermanas habitan juntos en paz”.“Las tradiciones abrahámicas comparten una visión común del aspecto que tendría un mundo restaurado, y esta comunidad de Omaha es un modelo vivo”, agregó. “Esta historia debe ser más ampliamente divulgada y replicada, porque cuando las personas pueden participar en un diálogo profundo y piadoso que aliente el genuino valor de la diferencia y el atesoramiento de la visión común, empezamos a entrar en la ciudad celestial”.El objetivo de Tres Fes es lograr una mayor comprensión mediante una mayor proximidad. “La experiencia nos enseña que la interacción puede transformar la intolerancia, la ignorancia y el temor en comprensión, respeto y confianza”, dijo Bob Freeman, presidente de la junta directiva de Tri-Faith Initiative  en un comunicado de prensa. “Las tres religiones abrahámicas comparten estos valores básicos que están arraigados en nuestra cultura del Medio Oeste”.La declaración de principios de Tres Fes dice que al trabajar juntos “nuestra visión es la de tender puentes de respeto, confianza y aceptación, rechazar los mutuos estereotipos, aprender los unos de los otros y contrarrestar la influencia de los extremistas y los agentes del odio”.Que la barriada sea parte de la iniciativa es importante, según explicó Anderson. “Hay montones de diálogos interreligiosos que tienen lugar en el país y en todo el mundo”, dijo. “Pero cuando el evento concluye, la gente se va del hotel y regresa a sus casas. Nosotros estamos ya en casa, y seguiremos viendo a los mismos vecinos todos los días”.Representantes de las tres tradiciones de fe que integran el proyecto anunciaron oficialmente, en una conferencia de prensa el 13 de diciembre, la compra del terreno y dijeron que la iniciativa se ajusta bien a su fe y sus comunidades.John Lehr, presidente de Templo Israel, dijo que era  “extraordinario…que en el mismo terreno donde los judíos de Omaha solían reunirse como el único country club que nos admitía, estemos ahora a punto de congregarnos de nuevo, pero esta vez en un hermoso y pacífico barrio multirreligioso, vinculados por los puentes del diálogo y de la comprensión mutua”.Anderson expresó que la empresa le dará a los episcopales “una oportunidad única” de vivir las promesas [del Pacto Bautismal de la Iglesia] con nuestros vecinos judíos y musulmanes”.Y el Dr. Syed M. Mohiuddin, presidente del Instituto Islámico, habló de la urgencia mundial de desarrollar relaciones interreligiosas. “En un momento cuando el mundo se dedica a levantar muros, esto es una celebración del tendido de puentes”, afirmó, haciendo notar que el Corán dice “Nuestro Dios y vuestro Dios es uno y el mismo”.Inaugurado oficialmente a fines de 2006, luego de años de debates, la Iniciativa Tres Fes comenzó como una serie de conversaciones entre el Templo Israel, una histórica congregación del judaísmo reformado en el centro de Omaha, y el Instituto de Estudios y Cultura Islámicos, ya que ambos querían establecer congregaciones en el oeste de Omaha. Templo Israel —que ya no cabe en sus instalaciones actuales, las cuales no puede extender—, proyecta reasentarse en el nuevo sitio, mientras la comunidad islámica iniciará una nueva congregación.Al principio, judíos y musulmanes andaban en busca de un socio cristiano para la iniciativa, de manera que las tres fes abrahámicas estuviesen representadas. Luego de que una denominación cristiana rehusara participar, se dirigieron a la Diócesis [episcopal] de Nebraska, que acogió el concepto con entusiasmo, según cuenta el Muy Rdo. Ernesto Medina, deán para la misión urbana de la catedral episcopal de la Trinidad y miembro de la junta directiva de Tres Fes.—La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora y reportera  de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT La singular Iniciativa Tres Fes adquiere un terreno común El empeño de Omaha creará una ‘barriada multirreligiosa’ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 15, 2011 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Por Elizabeth PaulsenPosted Mar 2, 2012 Rector Knoxville, TN [Episcopal News Service] La pérdida de su trabajo en los archivos médicos hace más de dos años le costó a Carol Hopkins su casa y la obligó a mudarse. Y aunque Hopkins, de 60 años, aún hace de la búsqueda de un nuevo trabajo una tarea diaria, teme que su edad esté limitando su capacidad de volver a encontrar empleo.“Intento mantenerme esperanzada y ser positiva”, dice.Hopkins es una de las docenas de personas sin hogar en Northampton, Massachusetts, y sus comunidades circunvecinas, que han encontrado solaz y una comida caliente en un ministerio ecuménico al aire libre que se llama “Catedral en la Noche”.El ministerio, que se inició en enero de 2011, es una colaboración de tres ministros: Chris Carlisle, un capellán episcopal en Smith College y la Universidad de Massachusetts; Stephanie Smith, pastora de la iglesia luterana de Nuestro Salvador [Our Savior’s] en South Hadley; y Eric Fistler, pastor de la iglesia congregacional de West Suffield, Connecticut, y ex ministro de educación para la iglesia Edwards [de la Iglesia Unida de Cristo] en Northampton.Los tres querían crear un ministerio de la calle en Northampton que le mostrara solidaridad a la población desamparada de la zona y atrajera a estudiantes universitarios.Northampton, una ciudad de aproximadamente 28.550 habitantes, es la sede de cinco universidades. El pueblo y el Valle del Pionero [Pioneer Valley] que lo circunda son también los lugares donde viven unas 670 personas sin hogar, según estadísticas compiladas por los condados de Hampden, Franklin y Hampshire en 2006, antes de que se acentuara la recesión.“Hay un cierto magnetismo entre las personas sin hogar y los estudiantes: una confluencia natural en la demografía”, dice Carlisle, que pasó 30 años trabajando con estudiantes de edad universitaria.Carlisle obtuvo una subvención de $60.000 de la Oficina de Jóvenes Adultos y Ministerio Universitario de la Iglesia Episcopal en junio de 2010 para crear el singular ministerio de la calle, que está concebido para reflejar las primitivas tradiciones cristianas.“Queremos crear una comunidad al aire libre que sea inclusiva. Esto no una extensión de la iglesia, es la iglesia. Jesús siempre estaba fuera de la sinagoga con la gente, y nosotros queremos seguir eso”, dijo Carlisle, que actualmente está en un [año] sabático en el sur de Francia.El culto se celebra cada domingo frente al templo de Primeras Iglesias , que le permite al grupo el uso del espacio. El templo está situado en la calle principal [Main Street] de Northampton, rodeada de boutiques y de las Galerías R. Michelson.En la noche de un domingo frío y ventoso de mediados de febrero se reunieron por lo menos 50 personas, entre ellas el Rdo. Tim Oslovich, a quien acompañaban una docena de sus feligreses de la iglesia luterana de la Trinidad en Vernon, Connecticut. Varias iglesias de Massachusetts y Connecticut han donado su tiempo y sus talentos a este ministerio.El espacio lo equiparon con cuatro calefactores de propano y seis lámparas portátiles adornadas con grullas de papel. Las lámparas fueron creadas y donadas por una clase de arquitectura de la Universidad de Massachusetts.Los participantes tenían a su disposición abrigos, sombreros, mitones y calentadores de manos, mientras la temperatura rondaba los 3 grados bajo cero.Al servicio religioso de 30 minutos siguió una comida. Todos los alimentos fueron donados por empresarios y lugares de culto de la localidad.“Intentamos no hacerlo sentir demasiado como un comedor de beneficencia. Todo el mundo se sirve y todos comemos juntos afuera”, dijo Smith.Y para muchas de las personas sin hogar que participan, la Catedral en la Noche es un respiro de acogida y una oportunidad de aprender más acerca de otros en situaciones semejantes.“Yo no me siento sola aquí. Siento también una obligación de ayudar, independientemente de mi situación”, dijo Hopkins.Parte de la subvención de la Iglesia Episcopal se ha dirigido a un programa de práctica para estudiantes universitarios que están interesados en explorar formas alternativas de culto.Ali Brauner, de 19 años, que estudia religión en Smith, está trabajando para crear pequeños grupos en su campus para debatir [temas de] justicia social y religión.“Existe una obvia disparidad en las clases sociales aquí”, apuntó ella.Además de atraer más estudiantes para ayudar a participar con la Catedral en la Noche, Carlisle dijo que él espera crear más ministerios de la calle en Greenfield y Holyoke.Pero la subvención de la Iglesia Episcopal se acaba este año, y la continuación del ministerio dependerá de donaciones.La Catedral en la Noche se concentra en la justicia social y su ministerio fue un foco de atracción para Shannon Farrand-Bernardin, de 33 años, que es miembro de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan y quien tuvo noticias de la Catedral en la Noche a partir de sus anuncios y de su página en Facebook.“Muchos individuos sin hogar, aquellos que luchan con las adicciones o con ciertas enfermedades mentales, al igual que muchos estudiantes universitarios, a veces dudan de tomar parte en la vida parroquial. No encuentran un sitio que les acomode en las comunidades eclesiales, o bien se sienten fuera de lugar”, dijo Farrand-Bernardin, que se graduó recientemente en el seminario y es asesor religioso de la comunidad de Smith College. “La catedral crea un puente muy importante para esa gente”.— Elizabeth Paulsen es una escritora independiente radicada en Brooklyn y miembro de la iglesia de Cristo en Bay Ridge. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/xoxAJH Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab La ‘Catedral en la Noche’ sirve a personas sin hogar y atrae a estudiantes Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rural & Migrant Ministry organized an interfaith delegation of more than 100 civil rights advocates, clergy and farmworkers from across New York state to spend “Farmworker Day” in Albany on May 21. ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] Fifteen years ago Rural & Migrant Ministry began advocating for New York’s farmworkers with the goal that the state’s labor laws be modified to extend basic labor rights and protections to the men and women who work in the fields, the orchards and the food-processing plants that comprise the state’s $3 to 4 billion agricultural sector.On May 21, RMM organized an interfaith delegation of more than 100 civil rights advocates, clergy and farmworkers from across the state – some traveling more than four hours one way by bus – to descend on Albany for “Farmworker Day,” to once again to ask legislators – mainly senators – to pass the Farmworkers Fair Labor Act. If passed, the law would grant farmworkers a day of rest, overtime pay and workers’ compensation, collective bargaining rights, and would extend public health sanitary codes to migrant worker’s camps.“I am proud to be here today on Farmworker Day to help bring to the attention of our legislative leaders that this is a basic human right, to be treated with equality in terms of wages and other opportunities that other labor groups have,” said Rochester Bishop Prince Singh in an interview with ENS in Albany.“But it also to me, as a person of faith and a leader in a faith community, brings to the fore the reality that we need to treat people who bring food to us, to our tables, with some clarity of dignity. All we are asking that they are provided with the same opportunities that other labor groups have.”In March New York’s Episcopal bishops met with Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and during that meeting made it clear that they supported equal rights for farmworkers, Singh said.Since the 1930s, farmworkers have been excluded from both federal and state laws that protect other labors. Legislators have repeatedly introduced legislation to assure agricultural workers these rights during the past 15 years. In 2010 the bill failed by four votes in the New York Senate; the New York Assembly has historically passed the bill.“Every year it passes in the Assembly and gets stalled in the Senate,” said the Rev. Michael Phillips, rector of The Church of the Holy Trinity in Manhattan, who rode the bus from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to the capitol. “It’s an issue of justice: Why deny farmworkers labor rights?”There are an estimated 80,000 farmworkers in the state and some 35,000 farms. Latinos comprise 78 percent of all farmworkers and 99 percent of farmworkers are foreign born, according to the Hudson Valley Farmworker Report published in 2007.Phillips, who coordinated the groups from Manhattan and New Paltz, where on its way north the bus stopped to pick up additional people, warned that while speaking with legislators and/or their aides that the supporters not allow the conversation to be steered toward immigration.“This is a labor, not an immigration issue … don’t be tempted to go down that rabbit hole,” he said, “There are undocumented workers in the field, but there are also American citizens and legal workers in the field. This is about their rights.“Legally or illegally, they are doing the work.”The Rev. Winnie Varghese, of St. Mark’s Church In-the-Bowery, and Rabbi Michael Feinberg, executive director of the Greater New York Labor-Religion Coalition, during the May 21 march to the capitol. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonMembers of the delegation gathered at Westminster Presbyterian Church for an orientation, followed by a march to the capitol, visits to the offices of legislators — both opponents and supporters — and held silent vigils during which they held orange signs with black letters that read “Farmworkers Deserve Equal Rights.” Singh and other leaders, farmworkers and elected officials took part in a press conference organized by the New York Civil Liberties Union.“The New York Civil Liberties Union is proud to stand with labor, human rights, religious and political leaders to call on the New York State legislature to correct an 80-year-old wrong and finally pass the Farmworker Fair Labor Practices Act. Eighty years ago, when the New Deal established major reforms to worker’s rights, farm workers were excluded because back then farmworkers were black and that’s the deal that southern segregationists insisted on to support reform. Today New York’s farmworkers are overwhelmingly Latino, but for them Jim Crow is still the law of the land when it comes to their labor rights,” said Donna Lieberman, NYCLU’s executive director during the press conference.“… Jim Crow was wrong then, it’s wrong now and it’s time to close the gap for basic worker protections … it’s time to ensure that the people who do the back-breaking work to putting food on our tables enjoy the basic protections and basic dignity that every individual working in New York state deserves and expects,” she said.At the start of the press conference, the Rev. Richard Witt, RMM’s longtime executive director and a priest in the Diocese of New York, placed a bushel of apples on the table next to the speaker’s podium. The bushel, he said, weighed 48 pounds. Apple pickers typically pick up to 168 bushels in an eight- to-10 hour workday.Sostenes Uribe speaking during the press conference. ENS photo/Lynette Wilson“It’s a heavy job but we are proud to do it because we need this for our lives,” said Sostenes Uribe, a farmworker and an American citizen, who injured himself picking apples and was subsequently fired from his job. “I come here in the name of all the farmworkers to raise the voice to pass the farmworkers bill.”Uribe, who spoke in Spanish through an interpreter during the press conference, said farmworkers often feel they go unnoticed and that he participated in the event to help raise their voices.Peggy Alt and her husband, Wayne Alt, a member of the United Church of Christ and a past RMM board member, traveled with the bus from Buffalo to Albany to participate in the day’s events.Despite the fact that consumers have become more conscious about food quality and the distance it has traveled, it’s been a slow process to bring consumers around to care about farmworker’s rights, said Peggy Alt, adding that part of the reason is that farmworkers tend to work behind the scenes.To draw attention to farmworker and their rights, RMM over the years has held marches across the state, marched from Harlem to Albany, held round-the-clock vigils in front of the capitol, performed street theater, and enlisted celebrities and mariachi bands to call attention to farmworker injustice.“We’ve tried every single way we can figure to just get attention,” said Witt, adding that once a year a delegation visits Albany, but that advocacy work continues at the local level throughout the year.“The thing that really captures it for me is that when we lost by four votes in the Senate two years ago, one of our youth looked at me when I was feeling really down and she said, ‘Well you know Moses was in the desert 40 years. Get over it.’ So it’s one of these things we just keep putting one foot in front of the other figuring that something is going to happen.”Progress has been made, however, over the years, Witt continued.Ten years ago, Witt said, legislators wouldn’t give RMM the time of day. “Now we are meeting with the majority leaders, prominent senators … so the voice of the farmworkers is getting more and more included — it’s just not being honored yet. And one of that ways you know that it’s getting more and more included is that you see the Farm Bureau and agribusiness stepping up their efforts to combat it.”The Business Council of New York State and the New York Farm Bureau — which according to its website “is a non-governmental, volunteer organization financed and controlled by member families for the purpose of solving economic and public policy issues challenging the agricultural industry” — are on record in opposition to the bill.“The agricultural workforce is a crucial part of our state workforce. Because of its unique nature, this workforce in this industry was exempted years ago from regulations that generally apply to other groups of employees. These conditions have not changed and have become even more important due to global competition and the increase in the advantages of sourcing locally,” says a legislative memo on the Business Council’s website confirming its alliance with the Farm Bureau.According to the Farm Bureau, 99 percent of the state’s 35,000 farms are family owned.The argument often raised by the bill’s opponents that without the benefit of cheap labor, the smaller family farms cannot compete “is just ludicrous,” said Gerardo Gutiérrez Jr., an attorney and RMM’s Justice for Farmworker’s campaign coordinator, adding that if anything, higher costs for industrial farms allow smaller farms to compete.Only four states – California, Maryland, Minnesota and Hawaii – and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico have laws protecting the rights of farmworkers, Gutiérrez said.The California Agricultural Labor Relations Act was passed in 1975, establishing collective bargaining rights for farmworkers. The law’s passage was largely the result of a grassroots effort led by Cesar Chavez, the Mexican-American labor leader and civil right activist.New York, by passing a law to protect the rights of farmworkers, could help break down the Farm Bureau’s argument for cheap labor and serve as an inspiration and a model for other states, said Witt.“If you have both California and New York doing something, it’s harder to argue that by providing equality to farmworkers it’s harder to compete. California has been doing quite well with it for more than 40 years.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. She traveled with the group from Manhattan to Albany to report this story. Interfaith supporters of farmworkers rally in Albany Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 23, 2012 at 10:28 am I am grateful for the witness of Rural and Migrant Ministry, and for all who went to Albany on Monday to advocate for justice for farmworkers. It is hard for every employer to balance fair pay and benefits with keeping costs low and producing affordable products, but we must treat people as children of God rather than machines, widgets, or simply viewing them as expendable. Winnie Varghese says: Jennifer Linman says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 23, 2012 at 12:43 pm The Farm Bureau argument against farm workers rights is the classic scare-tactic forever used to justify the exploitation of human labor. What is especially galling is that this is happening in 2012 and in New York! Are the citizens of this state going to continue to allow this injustice to exist? Isn’t it worth the dignity of our fellow human beings to know that the food we buy is providing a fair living for the people who labor in the fields?And to compare the labor situation in religious institutions with farms is laughable. Religious institutions have none of the same motivations, i.e. profit- motives, at play in which to abuse its workers rights willfully. Perhaps the farm industry would voluntarily improve the conditions for its workers because it is the right thing and do so to avoid the legislation? Are we foolish enough to believe that will ever happen? May 23, 2012 at 2:17 pm Sisters and Brothers,My father, who came from Puerto Rico when he was 18, was for a brief period of time a farm laborer. He used to tell me stories about the sub-standard “housing” and other amenities that employers provided him and his fellow workers in order to keep them close and extract as much from them as they could. Bottom line: If maintaining exploitive, racist and unequal labor systems is the only means through which farming folks can make ends meet; well then, they and their workers ought to get together and create a new system, one in which farm workers are no longer exempt from the protections and benefits that other workers receive. We simply must support those who “give us our daily bread.” Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, May 23, 2012 at 11:48 am I believe good farmers are good businessmen and we really need not worry too much about the giant corporations that grow our pesticide injected crops. Its just so ridiculous to claim that there is any good reason to exempt one class of worker from the protections that all other classes enjoy. If a farmer cannot afford to pay overtime he should consider another line of work and let a more competent individual take over. Also let’s stop pretending that the farm bureau represents some poor farmer in overalls, in this day of corporation plutocracy this is laughable. These are suits taking advantage of the poor migrant workers who suffer miserable conditions and should be allowed to bargain in good faith, be guaranteed one day off a week, job safety and get disability insurance. Every other worker enjoys these benefits and if it’s ok in New Jersey it should be just fine in NY. Wake up folks! These guys are going to erode your wages with inflation next. They want to take your social security, medicare, medicaid and any benefit they came get their greedy hands on. They hate our government and they want our taxes, and they never pay their share! So if you don’t stand up for the weakest members of our society you weaken the foundations of the whole country. Please visit ruralmigrantministries.org and just do the right thing. What would Christ do? Rector Belleville, IL May 23, 2012 at 10:22 pm Jennifer Linman said:“I am grateful for the witness of Rural and Migrant Ministry, and for all who went to Albany on Monday to advocate for justice for farmworkers. It is hard for every employer to balance fair pay and benefits with keeping costs low and producing affordable products, but we must treat people as children of God rather than machines, widgets, or simply viewing them as expendable.”That’s typical Richard Witt/RMM rhetoric and tactics. I, and my fellow farmers do not view our employees as “machines, widgets, or simply viewing them as expendable.” I can’t tell you how offensive that is. Just like when Witt in the past would call us “slave owners” and would throw out the “slavery” line. It is extremely offensive. And it is a false dichotomy. If you don’t agree with his or your position you are “immoral” and/or “unjust” and you must view your workers as “machines, widgets, or expendable.” It is scurrilous and outrageous and false.First off, I don’t cede the moral ground to you. Since you don’t want to apply these exemptions to your employees and your industry you don’t have a moral leg to stand on, certainly not to stand on some sort of perch and dictate who is and isn’t moral or determine what part of our laws or codes are or aren’t “moral” or “just.” Second, you offend church going farmers when you employ that sort of rhetoric. Witt has been doing it for years but let me tell you something farmers in rural communities have had enough of it. They will put up with a lot but they are sick and tired of it and they have had enough and pretty soon, priests and clergy, it’s going to start hitting you where it hurts, in the collection box. Comments are closed. Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ecumenical & Interreligious Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 23, 2012 at 10:43 am Thank you ENS for a well researched story on the plight of farm workers in NY State. As one colleague we met Monday pointed out, if NJ has these provisions in place, why can’t NY?I am so grateful for the witness of RMM in representing the stated position of the Episcopal Diocese’s of the state of New York in Albany. As a small not for profit supported by Episcopal congregations they are doing heroic work in opposing one of the most powerful lobby’s in Albany, the Farm Bureau, which can afford to have people like Mr. Pawelski comment regularly on every article which addresses this issue in the state of New York. The Farm Bureau is the primary obstacle to passing this bill, even though it seems that many of our Senators, as people of faith, agree with justice for farm workers in principle. The witness of the Roman Catholic Church and Roman Catholic people on this issue has historically been powerful, and we hope the faith of Roman Catholic legislators will be made manifest when this bill comes to the floor.We have all witnessed the horrific conditions that farmworkers work and live in here in New York. Their desperation should not be our excuse to overlook their exploitation. We pray for the day when the good labor laws on New York State, of which we can be enormously proud, are applied to all who work in New York.And to Mr. Pawelski’s point about the church not being subject to labor laws. That is true, and we have many, many internal guiding principals established by our General Convention that direct us to create just work environments. Many of our churches pay no one but the priest, if that, so I’m not sure it’s a useful comparison to compare a parish church to a corporate farm subsidized by the state of New York.Thank you ENS for telling a story that is rarely told. If you want to support the cause and meet some of the inspiring leadership of RMM, please visit their website at ruralmigrantministries.org In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN May 22, 2012 at 8:52 pm This op-ed appeared in HV Biz has a bit more detail:Don’t apply factory work rules to farmworkersChristopher Pawelski | Feb 12, 2010 |There is a bill before the state Legislature titled “The Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act” (S. 2247-B; A. 1867-A). There is a great deal of misinformation surrounding this bill as well as the issue of agricultural labor. Allow me to address a few of these issues.The primary proponent of this bill is a religious nonprofit organization called Rural and Migrant Ministry (RMM). The ministry acts as a self-appointed farmworker advocate organization because the overwhelming majority of farmworkers in New York state have neither elected nor chosen this organization or its designated leaders to represent them or speak on their behalf. Farmworkers do not attend their board or planning meetings and the handful that attend RMM’s annual Albany lobby day event are paid by RMM to be there. These facts were admitted by RMM Executive Director Rev. Richard Witt during his sworn testimony before the state Lobby Commission in 2001.RMM and its allies consistently claim that there are virtually no laws protecting farmworkers and they are “invisible” and ignored by society. The truth is there are roughly a dozen local, state and federal governmental agencies that enforce a plethora of laws that govern both the living and the working conditions of farmworkers in the state.Some of these laws, like the federal Migrant and Seasonal Protection Act (MSPA) only apply to farmworkers. Farmworkers are one of if not the most protected work force in the state. New York farmworkers earn, on average, more than $10 an hour. Most also receive free housing and all that it entails, including heat, electric and utilities. Many receive free cable or satellite television. Farmworkers in the state also benefit from a number of governmentally funded social-service programs that, in many cases, only exist for their benefit, including their own free government-funded health clinics, free day-care centers for their children (now 14 throughout the state) free child and adult migrant education programs, as well as their own free government-funded law firm which works only in their behalf. How does a farmworker compare with an urban resident working on the same wage tier when it comes to protections and programs?What we are talking about are five or six exemptions to state labor law. These exemptions, like the one for overtime pay, exist because of the production and marketing realities associated with farming. Farming does not take place in an enclosed building with a regulated environment. We have a limited time to plant and harvest. If overtime is enacted, farmers will have to cut hours during the growing season so as to afford the overtime at planting and harvest time which can’t be avoided. This may mean fewer overall hours and take home pay for farmworkers. And farmers do not control the prices we receive and cannot pass on increased costs. We absorb it or go out of business. Because of pricing and weather disasters, much of New York’s agriculture is reeling. In four of the past five years, my farm income was below the federal poverty line for a family of four. In 2009, my employees earned more than I did. Where would these self-appointed advocates and legislators who support them like the money to come from to pay for these mandates?I have no problem defending each and every one of the exemptions within the real world context of agriculture’s production and marketing realities. But I can’t, because the self-appointed advocates’ mantra is that these exemptions are “immoral” and “unjust.” They state that “there can be no justification for this unequal treatment. Attempts at justification of this exclusion are offensive.” Who assigned these organizations the authority to decide which exemptions are “just?” And many of these same exemptions that apply to farmworkers, like overtime pay, also apply to the employees of nonprofits and religious organizations. Yes, the very same organizations that are pointing their fingers at agriculture can legally “exclude” their own workers from receiving overtime. State legislative staffers also are exempt. Yes, the people who work for the people who want to end our exemption are exempt from overtime. The level of hypocrisy is astounding and they don’t have a leg to stand on to play the “moral” card.A number of farms in Orange County have switched from mono-cropping onions to growing a variety of vegetables. These farms supply the local farmers’ markets and the green markets in New York City. To grow those vegetables they have had to rely on a much bigger labor force than needed for the more mechanized onion farming. End the overtime exemption and they will be unable to afford their labor bill. They will go back to mono-cropping onions, if they can continue to farm at all. New York state’s unemployment and overtime exemptions for agriculture match the federal standard, making us competitive with neighboring states. If overtime is enacted you can kiss that local fresh produce goodbye as New York farmers will be unable to compete with New Jersey or Pennsylvania farmers who don’t have to pay it. And many farmworkers will lose their jobs. That will be the real world consequences of this legislation.The people who travel so far up the migrant labor stream, many year after year to the same farms, come here to work as many hours as possible to provide for themselves and their families back home. If the self-appointed advocates ever actually talked to farmworkers they would learn a common complaint is they aren’t receiving enough hours versus working too many. No one forces a person to work on a farm. If someone wants the benefits associated with factory work, they are welcome to work in a factory. But to attempt to apply the rules associated with factory work to agriculture is foolish public policy. Enactment of this legislation will undoubtedly lead to less locally produced food for our markets and a severely impacted upstate economy that is already hurting considerably.Christopher Pawelski is a fourth generation onion farmer in Orange County and is a member of the New York Farm Bureau’s labor task force. He can be reached at [email protected] Comments (9) Roger Walters says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 22, 2012 at 8:44 pm Wow, the lies, half-truths, misinformation and distortions of fact found in this piece are extraordinary. This is not surprising because Richard Witt and his organization has been spreading lies, half-truths, misinformation and distortions of fact in connection with this issue for years now. For one thing, current law has been for years, in connection with Workers Comp, if the farm has a payroll of $1,200 in a calendar year they have to provide it and the overwhelming majority majority of farms in the state fall under this regulation and comply with the law. Witt and his organization know this, and yet still spread the falsehood that farmworkers aren’t covered.Here is an op-ed I wrote that ran in the Albany Times Union a couple of years ago. It highlights the misinformation as well as the hypocrisy of this issue, because what these religious groups fail to mention is that another class of groups are also exempt from some of these handful of labor law exemptions that apply to farmworkers, including overtime … wait for it … the employees of religious organizations. Why is it I don’t see the church groups and Witt lobbying to end the exemptions for their employees too?What did Jesus say in the Bible to the religious leaders of his day, “remove the plank from your eyes so you can more clearly see the straw in your neighbor’s eyes” or something like that? And then didn’t he call them hypocrites? I highly doubt you have the honesty and integrity to leave this comment on your blog though.Here is my op-ed:MORE REGULATIONS BAD FOR N.Y. FARMWORKERSMiriam Pawel once again spreads misinformation and distortions regarding legislation proposed by the self-appointed farmworkers’ advocates in her Jan. 29 commentary, “Same old politics hurts N.Y. farmworkers.”She asserts: “The Farm Bureau’s argument is simple: These changes will cost too much. Agriculture is seasonal work, not comparable to any other industry … . But the experience in California … belies the Farm Bureau’s doomsday scenarios.”Evidently, Pawel doesn’t understand what “seasonal” means. California’s growing season is far longer, essentially year round, than New York’s. A strike at planting or harvest would destroy a farm in New York, unlike in California.She argues that if farmers’ claims that the bill’s expensive mandates would kill agriculture were true, then “it is acceptable to exploit farmworkers and deny them basic protections afforded almost every other worker in New York.”More than a dozen federal, state and local agencies oversee dozens of laws and rules governing farmworkers’ living and working conditions. This makes them probably the most protected work force in New York. The five or six exemptions Pawel talks about apply to some other workers as well, including employees of religious organizations and other non-profits driving this legislation.Where is the concern for those “exploited” workers? The hypocrisy is astounding.Pawel laments that “Farmworkers can be made to labor seven days a week, for as many hours as necessary, with no overtime, in back-breaking work. They need not receive unemployment when they are laid off, or be housed in shelter that meets safety standards. Because that would be bad for business.”The people who travel so far up the migrant labor stream, many year after year to the same farms, come here to work as many hours as possible to provide for themselves and their families. A common complaint is that they aren’t getting enough hours.New York’s unemployment and overtime exemptions match the federal standard, making us competitive with neighboring states. I know of no other industry that provides free housing for its employees, except clergy.Agricultural labor law is crafted within the context of agriculture’s production and marketing realities. Farming does not take place in an enclosed building with a regulated environment. We have a limited time to plant and harvest.Farmers do not control the prices we receive and cannot pass on increased costs. We absorb it or go out of business. And because of pricing and weather disasters, much of New York’s agriculture is reeling. In four of the past five years, my farm income was below the federal poverty line for a family of four. In 2009, my employees earned more than I did.Where would Pawel and others like the money to come from to pay for these mandates?The New York Farm Bureau does not give large campaign contributions as Pawel intimates. In fact, one of the biggest contributors here is New York State United Teachers, a union that aggressively supports this legislation.It’s unlikely that elected officials have been motivated by the paltry amounts farmers contribute. They are more likely taking positions based on the merits of our arguments regarding this bill. We are pleased that more of them are seeing through the propaganda and misinformation, and understand just how harmful this legislation would be.No one forces a person to work on a farm. If someone wants the benefits associated with factory work, they are welcome to work in a factory. But to attempt to apply the rules associated with factory work to agriculture is foolish, if not dangerous, public policy.Enact these provisions and you will see less locally produced food in our markets and a severely impacted upstate economy.Chris Pawelski is a fourth-generation onion farmer in Orange County and a member of the New York Farm Bureau’s labor task force. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Chris Pawelski says: Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags By Lynette WilsonPosted May 22, 2012 May 23, 2012 at 4:19 pm The Church, and all of us, are much blessed by the patient persistent ministry of Fr. Richard Witt, for decades. If California and New Jersey can live with the sort of legislation now being proposed, New York certainly can also. Arguments raised by the opposition seem without merit when we face the hardships of our migrant farm workers. Even small improvements in wages and living conditions would mean a lot to them. It is time finally to pass the legislation which almost passed last year. Jesus said, “In as much as ye have done it unto the least of these, my brethren, ye have done it unto me.” It is time, New York State, to protect our workers.! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Fr. Stephen Chinlund says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Chris Pawelski says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Frank Morales says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Richard Leon says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Chris Pawelski says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

first_img Submit an Event Listing By Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 8, 2012 Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME General Convention, Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT House of Deputies Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention 2012, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The House of Deputies July 8 approved on final reading an amendment to the constitution of the Episcopal Church to remove the requirement that consent for bishops elected within 120 days of General Convention be given by convention. The usual process for consenting to bishop elections is by votes of diocesan bishops and standing committees.Because the amendment was passed by both houses of General Convention in 2009 and already received approval by the House of Bishops at this convention, approval by the deputies in the required vote by orders makes the action final.The deputies began their session with a tribute to Pamela Chinnis, president of the House of Deputies for the conventions of 1994, 1997 and 2000, who died last fall, given by the Very Rev. Frank Wade, interim dean of Washington National Cathedral; and they later heard a report on the work of Episcopal Relief and Development by its president, Robert Radke.Deputies also elected four people to the Disciplinary Board for Bishops: the Rev. Angela Shepherd, the Rev. Peggy Tuttle, A. Joseph Alarid and William J. Fleener, Jr.In other action, deputies adopted the following resolutions:• C069, which calls for additional ministry on the campuses of community colleges, with a request of $760,000 over the next three years;• A133, providing financial support of $426,000 over the next three years for theological education for native leaders in the Episcopal Church;• A147, continuing the work of Forward Movement;• A160, supporting the Diocese of Haiti and commending the work of “Rebuild our Church in Haiti” by Episcopal Relief and Development;• A088, expressing expectations for leaders in stewardship in the church; and• A096, calling for reducing barriers, such as time away from home or jobs, for those participating in church leadership.— Melodie Woerman is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Belleville, IL Deputies approve ending bishop consents at General Convention Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 15, 2012 at 6:40 am Mr. Granger — No, I’m sorry, but your fame as a theologian has escaped me.You assert that your position is sophisticated and unbigoted. But you won’t try to explain it?At the same time you complain that the conversation is a one-way exchange?Most persuasive. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 15, 2012 at 9:42 pm Mr Bates, I haven’t the faintest idea what the snide comment about my “fame as a theologian” means. I didn’t write, nor did I imply, that I am a theologian. I rather suspect your bias – why else the implicit charge of bigotry? – has gotten the better of your carefulness in reading.As to not explaining my position – which is to say, the traditional (now considered conservative) Christian position regarding marriage as being between one man and one woman – has been frequently defended in print and electronic media much more capably that I could do in this space or at all.Tolle lege, Mr Bates. Tolle lege.Though I suspect that you’re already familiar with the arguments, and judging by the tone of your responses, have already decided that the position, and more to the point, anyone espousing it, is irredeemably bigoted and unsophisticated. Jeremy Bates says: Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release South Carolina Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bob Van Keuren says: July 18, 2012 at 6:46 pm Time marches onSlowly we are honoring God’s creationAmazingly– women–blacks-gays are people tooSlowly and reluctantly the Church is starting to wake upGays are god’s gift to the rest of us July 19, 2012 at 10:04 pm Gays are God’s gift to the rest of us? Given the current sexuality debate I don’t feel like one. And this from a refugee from an expression of the Christian faith, Southern Baptist, that at least to me perceptually when it comes to homosexuality at the time I left was all too ready to condemn both sin and sinner. July 20, 2012 at 10:24 am I want to thank you for giving me every reason to not believe in your version of God. Unfortunately for you, between the 1st century and today science has discovered more about human sexuality. When religion and science collide, reason has usually dictated that religion reevaluate its stance. The earth is not the center of the universe, gen. is not about a 7 day creation, slavery is wrong, it is really ok to wear clothing made from blended material, and we can eat pork safely. We know that one’e orientation is not something someone chooses. And if it is an innate part of a person, one can only assume that God has created us in that way. Christ taught us that God is a loving father, not a tyrannical monster who creates people in such a way that they should suffer. Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 16, 2012 at 11:20 am I am not immersed in this debate as others are, but isn’t it the case that Bishop Lawrence will have the authority to allow or not allow the new same-sex liturgy to be used in South Carolina? If he chooses not to allow its use in his own diocese, so be it. But I fail to see why he thinks his opinion of doctrine and discipline should have any influence whatsoever over whether the liturgy would be permitted in, say, Massachusetts or Connecticut. He obviously wouldn’t be equally comfortable with a situation in which Ian Douglas could dictate policy in South Carolina.This is an issue that has the potential to continue to rip the church apart for decades. The wise course is to let individual bishops determine the best course for their own diocese. The church has many other problems that it desperately needs to address. July 17, 2012 at 8:52 am Of all the things to have “grevious concern” over in this world. . . . July 14, 2012 at 1:37 pm If one believes that the Bible is the word of the Lord, then one must also conclude that to bless a same sex union is an affront to God himself.While it is right to ask God to bless an individual; it is wrong to ask God to bless what he has clearly called a sin. Donald Jack Newsom says: Rector Smithfield, NC Jeremy Bates says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 25, 2012 at 3:48 pm 2 Timothy 4:1 (NIV) In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: {2} Preach the Word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage–with great patience and careful instruction. {3} For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. {4} They will turn their ears away from the truth and turn aside to myths. {5} But you, keep your head in all situations, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, discharge all the duties of your ministry. {6} For I am already being poured out like a drink offering, and the time has come for my departure. {7} I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET R. Davis says: July 16, 2012 at 9:38 pm Even better, Mr. Granger–you refuse to justify your position with even one sentence in English; and then you tell me in Latin that I should read more!Once again, most persuasive. I mean really, five stars. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 13, 2012 at 12:59 pm What about Romans 1: 24 -27 don’t you understand? Your assertion on the early history of the church is ABSURD. Fritz Miller says: Jeremy Bates says: Todd Granger says: July 13, 2012 at 11:33 pm John D. Andrews, are you not aware that John Boswell’s claims, condemned in my hearing as “tendentious” by a same-sex blessing supporting priest of the Church twenty years ago, have been largely debunked and dismissed by most liturgical and cultural (Byzantine) historians who took the time to pay attention to his work? July 12, 2012 at 5:56 pm I guess everyone has the right to give up their place at the table. Some people leave the dinner table early. Todd Granger says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 17, 2012 at 5:10 pm Some still believe that the earth is flat; and there are analogues to that. There is something, however, in the American south that resists inclusion, it is still the place where minorities are the most excluded, most suspected of being “un-American” (whatever being American is), most vulnerable to hate-mongering and violent repression. There is also a saying that one hears from time to time: “South Carolina is too small to be its own country, and too large to be its own insane asylum.” Here it seems to fit. Comments (31) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC John Abdenour says: Featured Events Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: South Carolinians have ‘grievous concern,’ but have not left church July 12, 2012 at 8:12 pm It’s better than getting food poisoning AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Denise L. Unger says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Todd Granger says: July 14, 2012 at 5:01 pm John D. Andrews I would suggest you pay heed to what I have written in the following paragraph to John Snedeker about taking scripture out of context if you are truly interested in ascertaining its meaning.John Snedeker I would suggest that you review Romans 1:18 – 32 in order to place Romans 1: 24 -27 in proper context. Additionally Gen 3: 1-5 is also pulled out of the context of Gen 2:7 to Gen 3:24. A similar problem exists with Luke 4: 1-13. In context must be added Luke 3:21- 22 and Luke 4:14 – 30. If you and Todd Granger want to point to something that speaks at least to what two men might consider doing after obtaining a same sex blessing and not be out of context or have to resort to writers in theology and ethics or weblog comments then consider Lev. 18:22.In his book 20 Hot Potatoes Christians Are Afraid To Touch evangelist and ordained Baptist minister Tony Campolo, while aware of the Levitical prohibition sited above, back in the late 1980’s wrote that we should be able to do something more for our Christian homosexual brethren than just simply bid them to be celibate. His proposed solution was a covenantal relationship in which the life partners would provide mutual support to each other in abstaining from sexual activity. He didn’t mention separate sleeping arrangements. That, if I were to agree to a covenantal relationship with a life partner, I would have to insist on. Campolo also mentioned groups of homosexual Christians living in community also with the goal of supporting abstention in sexual activity. In that case, its either Factory Bunk Beds dot com for twin/twin bunk beds or Iron Mikes’ Military Exchange for military and or institutional bunk beds.It is because of this “cherry picking” of the scripture and that there is so much heat in the current rhetoric over human sexuality that, as I have written before and will write yet again, it is entirely possible that none of the parties currently involved in this dispute will live to see its resolution. It is also possible that prayers for a resolution will not be answered until time ceases to have meaning and we are gathered unto God as He answers prayer on His schedule, not ours.Finally, in mentioning Campolo and God’s schedule, Campolo also wrote in the same text that he did not argue that God could do anything, God was after all God. However he also wrote that there is a considerable difference between what God can do and what He will do. In retrospect as I look over my own ups and downs in my Christian walk I have no reason to doubt this statement. Sarah Ridgway says: July 14, 2012 at 12:04 am Denise L. Unger, the suggestion you make in your comment – that opposition to the blessing of homosexual relationships is motivated by a cold uncharitableness that would reject a child of homosexual orientation, and that this moral defect must be prayed out of the offender – is frankly offensive, and as much without substantiating evidence as an unthinking conservative claim that support for blessing homosexual relationships is motivated by nothing other than a desire to baptize concupiscence and to kowtow to the culture. Love is manifested by an acceptance of the person, not by an uncritical validation of everything about the person.As for “hard” answers – whose witness was hardest to bear in the midst of General Convention: South Carolina and the few deputies who stood during the reading of the conservative bishops’ statement in the HoD, or those deputies in the super-majority who voted for the same-sex blessing resolution and the large majority who voted for the transgender resolutions? Why do you for a moment think that those of us who continue to hold up traditional biblical and catholic teaching on human sexuality haven’t done any hard work in arriving at that position? Why do you think that position is so easy to maintain? It isn’t, if for no other reason than the fact that thinking hard about sexuality and sexual sin has the effect of turning a bright light on the dark corners of my own soul, to my own significant discomfort (which, Deo gratias, puts me on my knees). In the introduction to his book, _The Bible and Homosexual Practice_, Professor Robert Gagnon lists a number of risks taken by those who publicly espouse a critical position against blessing homosexual relationships: being labeled homophobic; being labeled intolerant; being labeled exclusive and resistant to diversity; being labeled uncritical (or, as you put it, “simple-minded”); being charged with promoting violence against homosexual persons. A public position of critique is not pleasant for most of us, leaving us vulnerable to the host of stereotypes listed (which you have yourself indulged) and positioning us squarely against cultural norms prevailing in most of the media and the academy – and The Episcopal Church. The public position of critique also carries with it regrets, not least that, in Gagnon’s words, “a rigorous critique of same-sex intercourse can have the unintended effect of brings personal pain to homosexuals”. Theological conservatives – myself included – deplore attempts to demean the humanity of homosexuals persons, though in a culture in which acceptance of one’s humanity means an uncritical validation of everything about the person – or at least, everything about the person considered important and admirable by the culture – simply opposing the blessing of homosexual unions is apt to be understood as precisely that.The reason that theological conservatives leave the table (whether by walking out of General Convention or by walking out of The Episcopal Church, as hundreds of thousands have done in the last decade) is that we are tired of being asked to stay at the table and engage in conversation – or as you more piously put it, to keep going to Church and to keep praying – when the “conversation” seems to be an entirely one-way exchange. Submit a Job Listing July 13, 2012 at 12:30 pm The South Carolina delegation, including Bishop Lawrence, should study church history (tradition). The church in its early years not only married same-sex couples, but had liturgies in order to do so. For a group that stands so firmly on tradition, they apparently don’t know the traditions of the church, or would rather ignore those traditions that do not conform to their modern biases. As for the Bible, no where in the Bible is same-sex marriage, or homosexuality, demonized. Of course, one would have to actually apply biblical criticism to the Bible to know what the Bible does say about those issues. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ John D. Andrews says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Todd Granger says: July 13, 2012 at 2:58 pm I totally agree the importance of understanding scripture. Before labeling anything as absurd, do you not think it is wise to research and discern the facts first? Rector Bath, NC July 14, 2012 at 8:29 pm While I am respectful of the work done by the many, many theologians who have weighed in on one topic or another over the history of the Church, I still can’t help but note that there have been seriously divisive issues over and over again, and for every five theologians on one side, there are also five on the other. There have been schisms and all sorts of reformations (including the “capital R” one), and an ever-widening number of new denominations and traditions, but whatever the conflagration, Christianity has risen from the ashes.Speaking totally personally, I am uncomfortable with any one contingent within the large Christian umbrella saying that they, and they alone, know the mind of God. I just don’t believe we are able to do that, regardless of how many years of “tradition” might support one opinion or another. I also don’t believe in worshipping the Bible; I worship God and his Son, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Spirit. I see the Bible as the story of an eternal dialogue between God and human creation, and our constant wrestling with our sin and repentance and God’s endless love and willingness to forgive, and not as a Rule Book.The more I study, the more I’m drawn to tolerance, despite my deep differences with certain faith traditions and practices — and I don’t find that to be inconsistent with Jesus’ teachings. And I’m OK with the evolution of belief and faith and how science and the mystery of life intertwine. To me it IS important that slavery was not just tolerated but expected in Biblical times but we now see it as a practice that does not honor God’s love for every individual person. It IS important that though Jesus spoke out against divorce, we generally now understand that forcing someone to remain in a loveless, lifeless marriage is wrong, and so is denying them the right to remarry with the blessing of the Church.I have concluded from my (limited) understanding (up to now) that the few references to homosexual behavior in Scripture refer more to clearly wanton, uncommitted sexual behavior, no different from heterosexual fornication, rather than an outright condemnation of homosexuality itself. And I cannot, for the life of me, believe that God would have created this whole class of people, solid and decent and hard-working and loving as anybody, but denied them the right to express their love to whom they want. (And from a scientific, evolutionary standpoint, if homosexuality was a useless aberration, surely it would have vanished by now through natural selection.)If the Diocese of SC feels that they must remain committed to their historical conservative viewpoint, then OK. But there is an evolution of mindset going on around them, like it or not. And eventually, they will have to decide whether their priority is sticking to their rules about human sexuality or remaining members of TEC. July 14, 2012 at 9:46 am Mr Bates, these arguments – as you undoubtedly already know – are readily available in print and electronic form, from such sophisticated and unbigoted writers on theology and ethics as Robert Gagnon, Ephraim Radner, Philip Turner, Christopher Seitz, Oliver O’Donovan, and Wolfhart Pannenberg. Weblog comments sections are rarely, if ever, a setting for profitable discussions of a complex and emotionally-charged topic.Of course, if you are predisposed to dismiss any arguments against same-sex blessings as unsophisticated and bigoted ipso facto, then there really isn’t any conversation to be had, is there? Thus the departure of theological conservatives from the conversation, precisely because there isn’t one. December 5, 2012 at 3:17 pm Thanks to Sarah Ridgway for a cogent “personal” statement, which nevertheless is in tune with progressive theology as well as a compassionate heart.To Angela H. – who is sure that the word of God condemns the “sin” of homosexuality.I wonder if it has escaped your attention that the church and scripture has a very long history of condemning women’s sexuality and valorizing the state of virginity. In other words, traditional Christianity has had a perverted way of reducing women to mere sexual objects to satisfy the domination needs of men, to shore up for men the power of women’s sexuality and to make sure that all women are in subjection to the male idea that only men are made in the image of God.In kind, the sexual objectification of homosexual persons defines them in terms of their sexual nature alone, much as traditionally the church has constructed women. Therefore, some members of the church also think that same-sex couples seek nothing more valued from the church than a “blessing for concupiscence.” The arguments from S. Carolinians who seek to separate themselves from T EC in America continue to define God as male, Jesus as sexless, Mary as a perpetual virgin and all other women as an occasion to sin. One of the most objectionable ideas, defined as a vile practice and abomination, is men who allow themselves to be used as women are used. There is no analogous or complementary assignation for women lying with women, only a condemnation of women lying with beasts. They all shall die, including the beast. At least that is what my Bible says. So, homophobia is multi-layered, including the fear and distrust of women along with the acceptance that such “unnatural lusts” of men toward men are an abomination to the Lord. Most often these students of scripture leave out the part that almost any sinners, say, described in Leviticus, must be put to death (which is what the government of Uganda is trying to do today).The most telling example of ethics and morality differentially applied to men and women is found early on in Genesis – The destruction of Sodom – which is often held up as a justification for persecuting homosexual men. Lot gave the sanctuary of his hospitality to two men, who were being besieged by the men of Sodom, commanding Lot to give up his guests to the crowd, so that they might “know” them. But Lot resisted their “wicked demands.” Lot bargained, ” I have two virgin daughters, let me bring them out to you, and do to them as you please, but do nothing to these men for they have come under the shelter of my roof . . . . (Genesis 19:1-9. One thing we learn from this Biblical story, is that the daughters had no sanctuary under the roof of their father, Lot. And from there we learn that Lot went on to commit incest with his daughters so that the family line would go on. This story is often “taken out of context,” as a warning to homosexuals, whereas it ought to be a warning also to women of their religious standing in the house of God, and the need perhaps to investigate the ethical development of a living God. July 14, 2012 at 3:03 pm John D. Andrews—as has been stated by Todd Granger—most of Boswell’s work has been proven incorrect in regards to same sax unions.center_img PJMuldoon says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel John D. Andrews says: Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem July 13, 2012 at 5:09 pm John Snedeker, here is a link to an article that proves my assertion is not “absurd.”http://anthropologist.livejournal.com/1314574.htmlAs for scripture, if you are only reading it, you aren’t doing enough to ascertain its meaning. Simply reading is great for spiritual comfort, but not nearly enough to proclaim doctrinal meaning. General Convention 2012, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Peter Hebert says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 15, 2012 at 7:28 pm I am from the albany diocese and not all people in the albany diocese agree with Bishop Love. He does not speak for everyone in the diocese, gay people have children,they are members of families,they have brothers ,sisters, parents. they love jesus very much and need to have a church they can go to where they can have brothers and sisters in christ who love them. We are all members of one body with different gifts. We have many gay people in our parish family. Bishop Love was upset that people didn’t listen to him at the general convention, He embarrassed and upset mother Ann and other people he didn;t agree with at the albany convention in june. priest in the diocese of all can’t even attend a gay blessing in another diocese, even as a member of the congregation. It hurts me that people are being excluded. I don’t think this is what god wants. love your sister in christ michele wilkins-hallmark John Poynter says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR David Yarbrough says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET John Snedeker says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Lewis Martin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Donald Jack Newsom says: July 14, 2012 at 8:29 am And so, Mr. Granger, your sophisticated, unbigoted reason for opposing same-sex blessings would be . . . ? Michael Hubbard says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 12, 2012 John Snedeker says: Richard Rhoads says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service John Snedeker says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 13, 2012 at 8:20 pm Really? THIS is your “proof”? My man, you should be more bold in your assertions. As an example I would refer you to Gen 3: 1-5 or Luke 4: 1-13. … that’s it for my visit to the fever swamps of KJS’s TEC. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY July 13, 2012 at 1:20 pm I hope that all of the South Carolina delegates were present for Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori’s closing sermon. I was born and raised in a small northern California conservative parish (Emmaunel Episcopal, Grass Valley,CA) My parents were from the depression era and very strict…I am not one “of those Californians,” in fact, I now live in Alabama.Ladies and Gentlemen from South Carolina it is all about love. Period! I pray for you that no child or grand child or nephew or niece of yours ever has an issue of sexuality. You don’t wake up one morning and think “I think I am going to be heterosexual.” or ” Hmmmm maybe I’ll be homosexual”. It is simply not as simple minded as many of you would like it to be. But love is. Please keep going to church. Please keep praying. Please keep seeking the answers they are hard. Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal News Service –Indianapolis] When most of the Diocese of South Carolina’s deputies left General Convention July 11 along with Bishop Mark Lawrence, their departure was meant to “differentiate” themselves from resolutions convention had passed the day before.Lawrence said in a statement posted on the diocese’s website July 12 that the departure of the deputies should not be understood as a departure from the Episcopal Church.“Frankly, a deputation to General Convention has no authority to make such a decision,” he said.In his statement, Lawrence described what he said during a July 11 private session of the House of Bishops. He said that he was grateful for the “intentional engagement in honesty and collegiality with fellow bishops.”Lawrence expressed his “grievous concern” with changes to the church’s canons through A049, which allows for optional and provisional use of a rite to bless same-gender relationships, and D019 and D002, which affirm the full inclusion of transgender persons in the life of the church (including the ordination process).“These resolutions in my opinion,” Lawrence said he told the bishops, “are disconcerting changes to the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church – to which every bishop, priest and deacon is asked to conform. More importantly they mark a departure from the doctrine, discipline and worship of Christ as this church has received them, therein making it necessary for me to strongly differentiate myself from such actions.”Lawrence said he left the House of Bishops after private conversation and would not be continuing in the remainder of the convention.“I concur with the assessment of our canon theologian, the Rev. Kendall Harmon, when he described the actions of this General Convention as ‘unbiblical, unchristian, unAnglican and unseemly,’” said Lawrence.He said in the diocesan statement that he knows “some did not think we should attend the 77th General Convention, but I believe our presence and witness was important and even respected by many on both sides of the theological divide. As St. Paul states regarding his ministry, ‘…we refuse to practice cunning or to falsify God’s word; but by the open statement of the truth we commend ourselves to the conscience of everyone in the sight of God.’”Lawrence said he would be sending a statement to diocesan clergy, which is to be read in parishes on July 15.The deputies that left were the Rev. Canon Jim Lewis, the Very Rev. David Thurlow, Elizabeth “Boo” Pennewill, Lydia Evans and Reid Boylston, while the Very Rev. John B. Burwell and Deputy Lonnie Hamilton stayed in Indianapolis.Burwell spoke to ENS July 11 about the deputies’ decision. That story is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Angela Harness says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA michele wilkins-hallmark says: Marlene Talbott-Green PhD says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags July 12, 2012 at 10:01 pm The Episcopal Church is sliding at an increasingly rapid rate down the slippery slope toward apostasy. Mark Lawrence and DSC are the voice in the wilderness crying for repentance. Unfortunately, those who listen are increasingly without influence in TEC – which is why such organizations as ACNA are growing rapidly.May God’s blessing continue to rest on Mark Lawrence and DSC, and may hearts be turned within TEC. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 18, 2012 at 2:42 pm I don’t recall reading anything in regard to same-sex marriagein the early Church Fathers or any ecclesiatical history. Exactly where does this information come from? What century? What area of the world? And why is it that our Roman Catholic and Orthodox brethren don’t seem to be privy to this knowledge? Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. July 12, 2012 at 10:25 pm Or causing it in others.last_img read more

first_img September 17, 2012 at 6:30 pm Blessings on all churches involved in this ministry. Very proud to see two churches from the Diocese of Lexington in this article.How can The Episcopal Church use its advocacy networks to lobby for policy to provide funding to such programs? Over 90% of the children served by the Reading Camp ministry in Kentucky qualify for free or reduced lunches. There are sites throughout the country that offer the NSLP (National School Lunch Program) meals to children throughout the summer, but I wonder if they reach every hungry child that benefits during the year? Every year, at least five of our campers comment that they only eat once per day at home.How do we ensure hungry children are fed on weekends and throughout the summer?Allison DuvallExecutive DirectorReading Camp, Episcopal Diocese of Lexington Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Janet Hale says: Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Poverty & Hunger Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events September 12, 2012 at 5:24 pm This program is spreading, but I encourage to think about what happens int he summer to kids who then do not even have school lunches. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Children, Fr. Michael Neal says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rich Chappell says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Allison Duvall says: Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev’d. Steven L. McCarty says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Moputo Jones says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Rev. Dr. Fran Toy says: September 12, 2012 at 11:30 pm Blessings in a Backpack is a wonderful program. Last April, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Evanston, Illinois began partnerning with Oakton Elementary School in Evanston – a school that already had a Blessings in a Backpack program. We now provide weekly support in preparing the backpacks for students and will soon begin assisting with shopping as well. So wonderful to see this making ENS news! And so wonderful to hear of the many congregations taking part around the Church. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Melissa Peter says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] When the community kitchen moved out of Calvary Episcopal Church in Ashland, Kentucky, after 30 years, parishioners wondered what to do next. “We have no idea what we should be doing to help our neighbors in need. We’ve got to find something to replace this,” they told the Rev. Ron Pogue when he arrived as interim rector in February.Pogue suggested Calvary join the Louisville-based Blessings in a Backpack program, which provides weekend food packages during the school year for children who receive free or reduced lunches. “I said, ‘Let’s see if we can feed 100 kids.’”“There were a few skeptics,” he said.The Blessings in a Backpack program involves parishioners of all ages at Church of the Good Shepherd in Lexington, Kentucky. Here, Kathy Gross, left, Ken Miller and Karen Furlow help prepare food packages for delivery to a local elementary school. Photo/Joyce RothBut seven months later, Calvary members have pledged to feed 112 children at Crabbe Elementary School – where 94 percent of students qualify for free or reduced lunches – at $80 per child for the entire year. They are poised to start buying, repackaging and delivering the nonperishable food as soon as the school identifies the recipients. And they hope additional pledges and grants will let them feed even more children, said Jeannie Broughton, who coordinates the program with Deacon Diane Zwick.Through various “backpack” programs, Episcopal churches such as Calvary are providing food for needy schoolchildren who otherwise might go hungry during weekends. More than 18 million children qualify for free or reduced price meals through the National School Lunch Program, according to Feeding America, but that only feeds youngsters on school days. Through Feeding America’s BackPack Program, nearly 230,000 children receive weekend bags of food assembled at more than 150 local food banks.At Trinity Episcopal Church in Lawrence, Kansas, where Pogue previously served as interim, parishioners fed 180 students a week in eight schools last year and are adding a ninth school this year through the Harvesters Community Food Network BackSnack program, said co-coordinator Greg Hazen.Every two weeks, Harvesters in Kansas City deliver pallets of free food to the church. About 30 parishioners pack the food into plastic bags in the backpacks – usually adding some donated fresh fruit – and deliver them to the participating schools each week.Trinity became aware of the program and got involved thanks to Hazen’s sister, Jeanne Fridell, a local school principal. The individual schools choose which students receive food assistance.“We initially targeted the schools that had the higher percentage of children that were eligible for free or reduced lunch,” Hazen said.Blessings in a Backpack, which feeds nearly 62,000 children in 437 schools in 42 states and three countries, uses a different model. Blessings provides nutritious menus, and participating partners such as Calvary meet with local grocers to see which will meet the “price points” to deliver the food for $80 per child for 38 weeks, Pogue explained. Calvary reached an agreement with a local Wal-Mart, which will provide the food at a cost of less than $2.10 per child per weekend.“The national Blessings in a Backpack program has a nutritionist who works with them to set up menus so that we’re sending good-quality food home with the kids, not junk,” Broughton said.Parishioners will pick up the nonperishable items, package them in Ziploc bags and deliver them to the schools for discrete distribution to students, Pogue said.“It’s a beautifully set up program that has a minimum of administration to it and a maximum of helping the kids,” said Zwick, who has seen the need for food assistance for children first-hand at the Ashland Child Development Center, where she is board of trustees president.“Some children just aren’t fed the way they should be at home, and they come in Monday mornings and they want four or five bowls of cereal,” she said. “It happens in public schools also.”Getting the food to the children can be easier than convincing a family to receive aid.“Last year, I got a call from the principal of one school, and the child was caught stealing food in the cafeteria on Monday morning. And that was because the child hadn’t eaten all weekend,” recounted Diane Wilson, parish administrator at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Summerville, South Carolina. Through its Backpack Buddies program, the church fed about 20 children in two schools last year and anticipates feeding about 45 in five schools this year.“I put out an e-mail to everybody I could find. Everybody brought me food,” she said. But they hit a roadblock. “That’s where the pride came in. The parents wouldn’t take the food. They didn’t want the school intervention.”She sees hungry children as part of a larger problem. “My thought is, if the child isn’t getting food, that means that the whole family isn’t getting food,” she said. The church’s next step, she said, is to work with schools to create a pantry “and supply food for the whole family, not just the children in their backpacks.” They’ve also discussed opening a thrift store.St. George’s funds the program – which costs about $240 per child for 10 months – through parishioners’ donations. “It’s all on faith that we’re doing this every month,” she said. “We’re just thankful that we can get them the food.”Besides helping hungry children, the backpack programs provide a way for church members to get involved in outreach and build community.Virginia Valentin chairs the Blessings in a Backpack program at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Lexington, Kentucky. The program is in its second year at the church. Photo/Joyce Roth“We got involved in this ministry last year, and it involves a large number of our folks every week helping to fill 60 backpacks for kids,” said the Rev. Brian Cole, rector of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, a Blessings in a Backpack participant in Lexington, Kentucky. “It’s a very hands-on, active outreach program around food and getting food to kids who are in need. … It ends up gathering all of our generations here.”To Broughton, the gospel imperative for such ministries is obvious. “We’ve been given very clear instructions that we need to go out … and do as Jesus would have done and take care of others,” she said. “Our faith isn’t very substantial if we keep it inside of four walls.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. The Rev. Debra Bullock says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Dottie Harrelson says: Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York September 21, 2012 at 1:03 pm God bless Fr. Ron Pogue! How does he have time to do all that he does? Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest September 13, 2012 at 8:05 am Maryfran: That’s a very good point. FYI there is a federally-mandated (and financed) program to provide lunches (and in some locations breakfasts or a late afternoon snack) to all children through age 18 in the summertime. Much depends upon local organizations (including, but not limited to, schools) and how much they are able to contribute in the way of personnel (administration, food preparation, serving, cleaning up, etc.) and venues (many church kitchens and parish halls are well-suited for this ministry). Schools often tie the meal program to their summer school schedule, but as funds for summer school have dried up in many communities, sometimes they only serve meals for 3 or 4 weeks of the summer, thus it’s important to find other sites. Some communities even have a mobile program, where a truck goes around to various parks and playgrounds and delivers the food to the children there (by pre-arrangement and registration of course). The meals can be as simple as sandwiches and fresh fruit, or as complex as complete hot meals. If your community doesn’t yet participate in this program, you might want to explore the possibility for next summer. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA September 13, 2012 at 8:34 pm Wouldn’t it be a better use of funds by political candidates vying for office if they would support programs such as Blessings in a backpack instead of using multiple millions of dollars for negative ads ? Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA September 12, 2012 at 6:10 pm This sounds like an awesome idea and program! Comments (11) September 17, 2012 at 8:57 pm We do the backpack program at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Clear Spring, Maryland. Every Friday during the school year, we supply 15 selected elementary school children with food for the weekend. The school counselor selects the children to receive the backpacks. We work under the guidelines of the Micah Backpack program; but at St. Andrew’s we call the backpacks, “Compassion Packs”. But, we do more than just supply food. The backpacks are packed by the local high school students who are in the Life Skills program, those students with various developmental handicaps come by the Church on Thursdays and pack the backpacks.. We also help students who need Student Service Learning hours for graduation obtain their hours by helping organize & clean the room where we store the food at the Church. September 13, 2012 at 9:26 am There seems to be a significant movement in the Episcopal Church through Blessings in a Backpack beginning with Kentucky, Illinois and Texas! In Houston, Texas, the Holy Spirit Episcopal Community (church and school) is feeding 60 kids in attendance of Blackshear Elementary. Blackshear Elementary is located in Houston’s Third Ward, which also happens to be a food desert, where groceries are difficult to obtain due to lack of supermarkets, lack of transportation and lack of resources. Our program grows everyday with plans in place to reach 200 by school year’s end. Our local implementation is named “Shear Blessings” with John 21:15 being our cornerstone…”Feed My Lambs”. Thanks for sharing this wonderful news at Calvary. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET September 17, 2012 at 10:31 am Count Epiphany Episcopal in Newport New Hampshire as one who feeds twenty kids a week with our own packpack program. Feeding America and The NH Foodbank will help this year but didn’t have the funds when we started 2 years ago. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Backpack ministries keep kids fed so they can learn By Sharon SheridanPosted Sep 12, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls September 12, 2012 at 2:08 pm That is a great program, we do it at our school here in KY also,and it is a great sucess………..GOD bless The Blessings in a Backpack……………….. Maryfran Crist says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

first_imgTREC issues letter to the Episcopal Church Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA January 1, 2014 at 5:53 pm Are the teachings of The Episcopal Church these days determined by biblical teachings and doctrine and enlightening and strengthening spiritually those who are members of it, or secularism and a perception of contemporary cultural shifts, forces and movement plus the lust and greed for power and money? December 11, 2013 at 10:42 pm I agree with the comment that describes the TREC letter as “verbiage”. Much of it seems very vague, but I read serious hints at what amounts to a misguided desire to implement the deconstruction of traditional worship and belief, to make the Episcopal Church more appealing to an evangelical, charismatic crowd. There seems to be a sense of urgency, recognizing the crisis of loss of membership, and implied financial health, which could be cured by “dumbing down” our theology, liturgy, and music, to attract a “21st Century” crowd. This would be a terribly mistaken policy, in my opinion. I’ve seen churches in which 90% of the congregation don’t kneel, where supplementary hymnals with more “homey, campfire style” music supplant the glorious traditions of our Anglican hymnography, where some clergy call the Nicene Creed “exclusionary” and mention that some congregations have abandoned saying the Creeds altogether! What is going on?? Don’t throw the Infant Jesus out with the bathwater! Don’t destroy our Episcopalian/Anglican identity to improve financial statements! Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Mary Morrison says: John M Stevenson says: Susan Speir says: Joseph F Foster says: December 12, 2013 at 12:53 pm Nothing. We have more than they have. See the comment above. Pople Francis is exhorting the RC to do what Episcopalians have been doing for decades. [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The Taskforce for Re-Imagining the Episcopal Church (TREC) has issued a letter to the Episcopal Church.TREC Letter to the Church: December 10, 2013In the last several months, the members of the Taskforce for Reimagining The Episcopal Church have been on a listening tour – in person and virtually. We have spoken with youth groups and bishops, the Executive Council and councils of local leaders; at provinces, at dioceses, parishes, and religious communities. We have asked people what their hopes and dreams are for our Church; what aspects of the Church they hope we cherish and strengthen; and what they wish we could be brave enough to let go of in order to make our Church more vibrant and mission-focused.Our listening to the Church is an ongoing process. What we have heard is a deep, abiding love for our Church and its unique way of creating Christ-centered community and mission. The Book of Common Prayer and the beauty and mystery of our liturgy bind us together across ages, geographies and politics. We deeply love the intellectual as well as the spiritual life that is cultivated in our members (“you don’t need to leave your mind at the door”).On many other issues, we disagree. We heard calls for the Church to be “less reactive to social issues,” and also calls to make the Church’s voice on social issues even louder. We heard calls for more diversity in our liturgy and music, and equally urgent calls for less. We would have expected nothing different! Many of us cherish the diversity of our community as much as we cherish the common beliefs and traditions that bring us together.But there were several loud and urgent themes that consistently ran through our discussions: the Church is calling for us to reduce the bureaucracy and resource-intensity of our Church wide processes. The Church wants the work of General Convention and other Church structures to be more relevant and more life-giving to our local parish communities. And, the Church wants us to face and grapple with the tough issues and the “elephants in the room” that suck up our resources, time and energy and that block our growth.As a taskforce, we have been reflecting on what we have heard, and the vision of a reinvigorated Episcopal Church is emerging.A New VisionImagine a world where all of our Episcopal parishes are spiritually vibrant and mission-focused. A recent survey suggests that less than 30% would pass this test today. [1] Imagine a world where our parishes consistently are good at inspiring their traditional members and also are energized and effective in reaching out to new generations and new populations. Imagine a world where the shape of our Church frequently adapts, as new parish communities emerge in non-traditional places and non-traditional ways, and as existing parishes merge and reinvent as local conditions change. Imagine a world where Episcopal clergy and lay leaders are renowned for being highly effective leaders, skilled at Christian formation and community building, at new church planting, at church transformation, and at organizing communities for mission. Imagine that Episcopalians easily collaborate with each other across the Church: forming communities of interest, working together to share learnings from local initiatives, and collaborating to pool resources and ideas. Imagine that the Church wide structure of The Episcopal Church primarily serves to enable and magnify local mission through networked collaboration, as well as to lend its prophetic voice. Imagine that each triennium we come together in a “General Mission Convocation” where participants from all over the Church immerse themselves in mission learning, sharing, decision making and celebration.Realizing this visionIt will take far more than structural changes in order to realize this new world. It will take resolved and capable leadership at all levels of the Church, and it will take broad and deep cultural change within the Church. We will have to work through a grieving process as we individually and collectively lose structures that have been critical parts of our lives and even of our identities. At the same time, we will also have to find a way of adopting a new and more hopeful mindset: we will need to believe—truly believe—that The Episcopal Church can, should and must GROW!In our work, we will call out some of the non-structural changes that we believe will be critical to living into a new vision of a vibrant, growing and adaptive Church. We will give some suggestions for how we might go beyond structural reform to achieve these changes in leadership behaviors, culture and organizational capability.We will focus most of our time as a taskforce on developing a set of recommendations for structural or “technical” changes that we think will be a critical part of reinvigorating the Church. These changes will play three important roles in the revitalization of our Church:They will “clear the way” for innovation and adaptation, freeing up our time and energy, and speeding up decision making.They will give the leadership of the Church a bold and holistic agenda of change which, if adopted, will role model the kind of similar bold changes that must occur at every other level of the Church.They will reinvent the role of Church wide organizations and structures: away from “doing” mission and towards enabling mission; away from setting agendas and assigning resources and towards connecting local communities and individuals for mutual learning, support and collaboration.What to expect from usWe have identified a number of key issues that we believe must be tackled through structural reform. We are working to develop proposals that address each of these issues. Some of these proposals will feel incremental, and many have been debated before. Some will feel bold and risky. Some of them will go beyond the scope of a narrow interpretation of the resolution that created our Taskforce (C095). Some of them go even beyond the scope of the authority of General Convention, and thus will take the form of “recommendations” or “prophetic proclamations” rather than legislative proposals. Taken together, however, alongside the many exciting, vibrant, and hopeful things already emerging around the Church, we believe that our proposals will be part of the ongoing work of setting the Church on a new path towards health and vitality.Some of the areas in which we are developing recommendations include:The role and mechanics of General Convention: Narrowing the legislative agenda and reducing the size of its legislative bodies, while expanding the scope of our get-togethers so that they serve not only as places where key legislation is debated and adopted but also as vibrant, open and inclusive celebratory Mission Convocations—bringing together passionate and active practitioners of every kind of mission going on around the Church.Roles and accountability of the Presiding Officers and of the Executive Council–particularly as related to Church wide staff: Establishing simple and clear lines of accountability and responsibility, reducing redundancy, clarifying confusions which can inhibit clear decision-making processes, and resizing the Council to function more effectively as a governance board.Breadth of CCABs (Committees, Commissions, Agencies and Boards) and the creation of alternative, fresh and creative models for Church wide collaboration: Recasting most of our CCABs into a new model of distributive and accountable collaboration. Creating on-line collaboration models that connect local mission leaders across our Church so that our collective “agenda” can dynamically adapt to local needs, and so that we tap into the greatest asset of our Church—all of us, sitting in the pews, doing great work locally but mostly disconnected from each other and from The Episcopal Church.Number of dioceses: Considering a one-time, objective process for establishing norms for a healthy and viable diocesan size and structure in order to enable mission and reduce the complexity of our organization.Capacity and leadership development: Establishing effective leadership formation and development approaches for all orders of ministry, grounded in our vows of baptism and ordination, as well as in the particular needs of the 21st century. Calling out the implications for clergy career paths and deployment, as well as the implications and opportunities for seminaries and other current leadership development programs. Encouraging the creation of new “centers of excellence” or other mechanisms for fostering ongoing learning and large-scale capability building, encouraging networking around existing nodes of great work.It is also clear that there is a deeply felt need to develop some common understandings of how individual dioceses can best make decisions about, and provide the best support for, parish vitality and viability. Given how vastly different the cultural and demographic landscape has become since most of our congregations were founded and buildings constructed, how do we make the most faithful and strategic use of our resources as we make decisions about the number of parishes, locations, consolidations, new plants, etc.? This work is largely in the hands of local dioceses rather than the General Convention, but we hope that our work will contain some reflections and recommendations that may be taken up by the whole church around these pressing and critical issues as well.What we need from youWe have a huge and complex scope of work, and we need your help! Please keep talking with us and giving us feedback and ideas. If you have not convened a discussion with our Engagement Kit, or completed our on-line questionnaire, please do so! If you have reactions to our Episcopal Identity and Vision paper posted on our website, please send us your feedback and ideas. We are revising it with the feedback we have already received and will continue to revise it as we gather additional input.  Please send us your feedback and ideas regarding this letter.Going forward, please watch for drafts of recommendations around the areas of reform that we have highlighted in this note. We will post installments around our ideas as quickly as we can, beginning in late January 2014, to enable as much discussion, debate and feedback as possible. We will continue to post updates to our evolving proposals through the course of the year, as we work towards finalizing our work in late 2014. In addition, we are in the process of planning a special gathering of the Church in the fall of 2014 to further discuss our proposals and to receive feedback. In line with our vision to live into new ways to “do Church” in the 21st century, this meeting will be virtual, so that we can involve as broad and diverse a group as possible, without restricting access to those who don’t have the financial resources to join an in-person gathering.Finally, please pray for us and for all who are engaging with us, as we try our best to discern the right path for our Church. You might use the prayer that members of our Taskforce have written for us:Holy Spirit, who broods over the world, fill the hearts and minds of your servants on Taskforce for Reimagining The Episcopal Church with wisdom, clarity and courage. Work in them as they examine and recommend reforms for the structure, governance and administration of this branch of the one holy catholic and apostolic Church. Help them propose reforms to more effectively proclaim by word and example the Good News of God in Christ, to challenge the world to seek and serve Christ in all persons—loving our neighbors as ourselves and to be a blazing light for the kind of justice and peace that leads to all people respecting the dignity of every human being. Be with The Episcopal Church that we all may be open to the challenges that this Taskforce will bring to us—and help the whole church to discern your will for our future. In the name of Jesus Christ our Mediator, on whose life this Church was founded. AMENThank you for the trust you have placed in us, and in the input you have already provided. Thank you in advance for the input and vigorous debate that we hope will mark the next phase of our work with you.For more info, questions or comments, contact TREC members at [email protected][1] David Roozen, “A Decade of Change in American Congregations: 2000-2010,” Hartford Institute for Religion Research, 2011.TREC Engagement Kit: http://reimaginetec.org/NOTE: the information in Spanish will be available shortly. Larry E Collins says: Gail Grange says: Steven Colburn says: Ceil Fruchter says: December 12, 2013 at 1:34 pm Thank you for this process and the opportunity to contribute $.02 in the comments. Not sure if this is helpful but I’ll put it out there. If churches need to grow, and I think that they do, and this letter seems to acknowledge that, then it seems like attention needs to also be place outward, toward the people who are *not* part of the church, and ask, why not? How can we serve you, spiritually and otherwise? What is needed to build new bridges and community out into our neighborhoods and towns where they have been lost? What I’m reading here, seems very inwardly turned and self-focused, which may also be necessary, but seems to only consider half of the equation for how growth happens. Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC December 11, 2013 at 9:34 pm Why do you feel that TREC will not bring the desired changes to our Episcopal Church ? What do the Romans have that we Episcopalians do not have ? Rector Hopkinsville, KY Joyce Ann Edmondson says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 11, 2013 at 9:17 pm Amen to that. A lot of what we have read in TREC sounds like verbiage. They need to simplify their language and get to the roots of what we need to do in a practical sense. …”commitment to simplicity of life and service to the poor. His (Our) personal example is all important …That radical Christian life is what is missing in our bishops, priests, and lay leaders.” Catherine Cummings says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID December 18, 2013 at 3:58 pm I agree with Mary…but the disconnect seems to be in how people “see” us and maybe how we “see” one another. What is the missing piece? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC December 12, 2013 at 5:53 pm I work for an extremely large corporation (150,000+ employees). Reading through the letter, I recognized the same language, assumptions and approaches that have been part of the corporate (secular) world for decades. By editing a few words here and there, the letter could pass for another ‘communication’ from a high-level task force addressing an audience in a large business.TEC must understand that we have are entrusted with a life-changing, life-affirming, and life-saving gospel to preach to fallen humanity. Anything else and we continue in the slow death-spiral of the past 40 years. Roger Brown says: December 12, 2013 at 1:49 pm Words, words, words. Action speaks louder and does more real good in the world. Our millenials along with others show up when there is something to help with, not for more information or regular church. I’ve been an Episcopalian all of my life and as a priest and rector, I can tell you that what people want to do is be guided into helping others. When we put out a call for the soup kitchen or food bank, we have lots of volunteers. Let’s stop thinking we are part of an elect that has to have a new system and answers to every scenario before we begin. Copy Pope Francis! Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Liz Haltom says: Bob Partlow says: December 12, 2013 at 10:43 pm I agree with Joseph Foster my comment is that most of these churches preach the “God of prosperity”. Or else “we are the “good” Christians we are opposed to single mothers, divorced people, gays, people on welfare or the unemployed”. They distort the Gospels and quote only very judgmental parts of the Old Testament. They often preach that the Second Coming is close at hand and only “they” will be “saved”. Unfortunately, this is the only version of Christianity that many people know about and they reject it.I don’t see why some people point to Pope Francis, the Episcopal Church has been saying and practicing this for years and our bishops have spoken out against demonizing he poor, single mothers, gays etc. It seems the RCC is catching up to us and not the other way around. I think we need to get our message out there somehow. Structure, Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT December 15, 2013 at 3:56 pm Also my biggest fear!! Bob Woodson says: Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release December 11, 2013 at 10:21 pm I am slowly digesting Pope Francis document on revovering the joy of evangelism. I think we would be wise to start with a similar document for ECUSA. We need to articulate a theology of the church that will enable us to share the joy. If we do not recover that joy, we are simply rearranging the deck cairs on a sinking shp. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Carla Aldridge says: December 12, 2013 at 12:25 am :…nondenominational places of worship.” = highly localized protestant denominations with one or at most a few congregations. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bob Partlow says: December 11, 2013 at 6:14 pm In Alabama our diocesan camp and conference center,Camp McDowell, has for decades been an enormous source for inspiring, teaching, and forming the diocese into “family.” This is also shared with a large number of non-Episcopalians. The committee should take a close look at what is going on here.Our bishop, Kee Sloan, and the director of McDowell, Mark Johnston, should be carefully listened to.I can’t think of anyone others who could be more helpful in this process. – Doug Carpenter Press Release Service Featured Events December 13, 2013 at 11:10 am I agree completely with Weston Cook. We just do not have a plan to sustain small congregation ministry. I also encourage a thorough reading and reflection on Pope Francis exhortation on restoring the joy of th eGospel December 12, 2013 at 5:52 pm This letter is emblematic of the problem in the first place. I am envisioning committees of individuals spending months “listening” when any experienced observer could have sat down at their laptop and knocked out a cleaner version of this in a couple of hours. Maybe it is the perceived need of consensus that makes these documents so tortuous. How many hands were involved in this?The mammoth length and vagueness of the letter make this a most unrewarding effort. Make your recommendations! Make them simple, clear, easily understandable! I get a general thrust towards the idea of a stripped-down and more accountable church management, but even within the very generalized statements at the end of this there is huge fuzziness. This is not helpful. Get clear, get specific, present it simply, or no one will read it. Or is that simply not the Episcopal committee way? December 12, 2013 at 8:58 pm As a cynical old New Hampshire Yankee, I confess to sharing much of the weariness expressed by some of the respondents here. The phrases, the images, the cliches, I’ve heard it all before so very many times. But as an lay Episcopalian and a TSSF Franciscan, I want so much to join the TREC and other “people of hope” in our church. And I don’t want to be a boor or a jerk. So, here, in one sentence is what I have learned in my four decades in this church is the primary desire of the majority of Episcopal. They want a priest. Rector, Vicar, Cluster Missioner, “Canon Nine”, resident Deacon – they don’t care. They want someone among them to share community and icon the Lord while they’re doing ministry. They want sacraments, liturgy, and that perspective that comes from being more wired into the higher levels of Church and having a degree of detachment. So, TREC, what can you do to create pastoral models of priesting that more of our congregations can afford? [Oh, and I wouldn’t mind a little less derision directed at those of us who are called to minister to animals as comrades in God’s Creation but that’s my personal calling.] Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET David Waller says: Weston F. Cook, Jr. says: Ann Tucker says: Bob Partlow says: James Graham says: john Neir says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Denny Allman says: December 13, 2013 at 12:57 pm Hear, hear, David Waller. I have made note of this for many years in many meetings. After all the newsprint has been shared and analyzed it could just have been written for the Rotarians or Lions. I realize that I seem to be in the minority but for me the First Purpose of the Church is to worship almighty God. If we do this we will want to do the things that He would have us do. Unfortunately , I detect little desire for this in most of the comments in the link that is in the letter. If any haven’t been there, I commend it to you. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK December 13, 2013 at 8:59 pm Is there now something wrong with being different from the other congregations in the community? (I came to the Episcopal Church in a VERY small community BUT the new young priest right out of seminary was the REAL pastor in town – wore his collar, visited businesses in town as well as his congregation.) We have the finest “script” for the finest ” drama”/worship in town.What happened to obedience? Congregations can’t adhere to the basic BCP worship. Priests ignore diocesan standards (when they are existent!) as well as the bishop as he expresses expectations.Priest are largely unseen in the community (Too busy) and avoid wearing the uniform while out in the community (while policemen and other who have a uniform wear them in public).What happened to instruction of any significance? People are baptized and confirmed with “conveniently-designed” brief instruction.Should not congregations have a standard expectation of their members and have it readily available?But, then, I am probably “blowing in the wind”. After all, 60 years since ordination, I am just a “retired old fool.” The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Neal Michell, Dean, St. Matthew’s Cathedral, Dallas says: The Revd (Canon) Kale Francis King says: December 12, 2013 at 1:37 am I would just like some of the people who are out there listening to parishioners and clergy to also collect concrete ideas we could do now. These ideas do not even need convention approval but would make our faith more visible in our communities. Starting a preschool/daycare in our church neighborhood would not only fill a huge need but also let neighbors learn about us. We say we want young families but do not currently do much to facilitate that. I would also like to get more of our community college to visit and know us. Many of these students are gifted musicians and with a stipend could add to our worship. Currently our choir director is bringing in local young musicians and talented parishioners for special services. Would not a musician in residence program be great? I do not think the stipend would have to be so big to attract interest. I think young college kids might then also draw in their peers besides enriching our community. Music has a way of connecting people with faith in a non threatening way. Just a humble thought. I would love to hear other ideas that a parish could do on their own initiative rather than waiting for a top down approach through a lot of hierarchy. Rector Albany, NY December 12, 2013 at 12:12 pm As a retiree member of our church, where the average age is 65, we are continualy challenged to reach out to the young people attending the liberal arts college across the street. Several attempts to establish a Canterbury Club have been unsuccessful. . However we have a new younger rector (39) who seems to be making some success in drawing younger families into our church family which is encouraging. We’ll continue to welcome the students who may enjoy our 5:00 PM Saturday Contemporary service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME December 12, 2013 at 8:42 am Pope Francis has modelled church and clergy in new ways already. Has seldom relied on transcontinental meetings, travel or listening. We know why church is not relevant to young people today. Changing the music is not the answer. As a therapist I am aware that young people today, as always, want something bigger than themselves and want to make a difference.Leadership, committment, old but ever new values are needed today, as always. Our Episcopal identity is valuable and can be valuable to the world today. December 13, 2013 at 9:22 am Help us please. What has happened to Adult Confirmation for new people that show interest in our church. I am a convert myself and I remember being approached by the priest and some of the congregation. The Service and my Commitment was a deeply moving experience. I believe that confirmation should be offered to all ages. As blessings received. What is happening to our traditions as we strive to change. Do we want to be like our neighbor churches. Our priest seems reluctant to offer Confirmation to our new adult people. We have so much to offer even as we are. Comments (34) December 12, 2013 at 3:31 am Item number 4 could produce some interesting and helpful results, although I’m sure that it will turn out to be among the more contentious issues. No one ever said that the process of change will be easy, or trouble-free, although it may be necessary. Thank you TREC for your work!4. Number of dioceses: Considering a one-time, objective process for establishing norms for a healthy and viable diocesan size and structure in order to enable mission and reduce the complexity of our organization. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel December 13, 2013 at 11:13 am I share your appreciation of Pope Francis. In ECUSA I think we continue to confuse Tradition and Tranitionalism Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 11, 2013 at 8:37 pm I understand all of the needs and concerns expressed about reducing and refining certain structures of the church. I fully support the need for re-visioning and restructuring. What does concern me is the potential for “re-disenfranchising” people when we reduce the sizes of CCAB’s, GC Deputations, etc. Invariably and historically, the marginalized and disenfranchised are the “last and least” with voice and recognition in our various structures. So reductions literally reduce them out of that voice and recognition. Similarly, some of the non-budgetary resolutions often involve creating and maintaining the diversity of our church. They are not so “popular” at the local level, often because they force us to look at our shortcomings about race, gender issues and sexual orientation. Many at the local level choose to avoid looking and many would also vote against resolutions intended to maintain our diversity. I look at Province IV in particular. We have not yet raised awareness and sensitivity enough in our province on these “hot button” issues. In what is often true Southern fashion, we choose not to discuss un-pleasantries. So I find that I must be ever aware and vigilant when I look at what impact any proposed revisions to our structures might have….whether unintended or intended. Just my thoughts at this point. Bruce Garner, L3, Atlanta The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Dec 11, 2013 Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Vikki Nordeen says: Rector Belleville, IL Bruce Garner says: December 11, 2013 at 5:52 pm I recommend the “Time Magazine” Man of the Year issue, which highlights the revolution Pope Francis is beginning in the Roman Church. Of first importance is his commitment to simplicity of life and service to the poor. His personal example is all important and has won praise from people throughout the world. That radical Christian life is what is missing in our bishops, priests, and lay leaders. Without holy lives to inspire and commend us the institutional changes proposed by TREC will not bring about the desired changes in the life and mission of the Episcopal Church. Put simply, we must be more Christian, following the example of Pope Francis. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Jane Greene says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN John C. Kimbrough says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Sally Rooney says: The Rev. Fred Fenton says: January 18, 2015 at 6:24 pm One thing the pope has is a public relations genius, Greg Burke. Just google pope pr and you’ll see what I mean. Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York December 20, 2013 at 1:43 am What the RCC has that Episcopalians do not have is consistency of belief. Their doctrines, teachings, and worldview have not changed. Pope Francis has added humility and civility, and refocused the church on actions and not just theology, but he has not changed any fundamental doctrines on abortion, homosexuality, divorce, women in the church, or any of the things that now divide us. Episcopalians seem to want to abandon long-held but now unpopular beliefs and become ‘of the world,’ not just ‘in the world.’ And THAT is the elephant in the room. We’ve become the religious social club of the 21st century. You taught me over decades to believe one thing, and then you change that belief and I’m supposed to follow you into the new doctrines? So if the old doctrines were wrong, what makes the new ones right? Moral relativism is a death knell. We look askance at the RCC and equally askance at the Southern Baptists, the charismatics, and the Mormons. But they are all consistent and solid in what they believe and are growing. We can’t seem to figure out WHAT we believe anymore, and we are suffering for it. Joyce Ann Edmondson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rev. Dr. Jim Shumard says: December 11, 2013 at 5:39 pm Anecdotally, Billy Sunday, evangelist of the early 20th century, said that the Episcopal Church was a sleeping giant. Hopefuly, these are waking moments to assist others in seeking a spirituality which has been, in part, reflected in the rise of nondenominational places of worship. December 12, 2013 at 12:01 pm I disagree that the letter is verbiage. It is very directional. If they were to start with actual policy and program suggestions, the letter would have been picked apart. They are beginning with big picture directions. I applaud this committee and its work. It is, I believe, hearing what I have heard.The directions are all moving in a helpful direction. What I read in this letter is a call for a reduction in bureaucracy, shifting the denominational apparatus from “doing ministry” to enabling ministry, reducing the legislative busyness of our denomination, and, putting resources into leadership development, and most interesting of all, tackling the issue of effectiveness of dioceses according to size and resources.The great challenge is how to use the resources of the larger church without overstepping the prerogatives and greater effectiveness of the work at the local diocesan level. Local mission and oversight is much more effective than centralized oversight and accountability. Those with long memories will remember the brouhaha over the General Fund Special Program in the 1960s that allowed for funds to be spent in dioceses without the permission of the local bishop. It caused a furor in the church at large. At a time when all sorts of institutions are (rightly) moving away from centralization and moving ministry to the lowest level possible, now is not the time to shift power to the central denominational hierarchy for what could become a well-intended but anger producing centralized control of new ministry endeavors. Let us not repeat that history, please. December 11, 2013 at 10:04 pm I don’t believe the average Roman Catholic or Episcopalian is a radical, everyday Christian. We often see or read about “others” within both denominations that do these extraordinary services for the poor, but the average church member doesn’t do this every day. I do believe the Episcopal church has gone farther than the RCC to be merciful to the divorced and remarried, the gay and lesbian community, the women priests, bishops, etc. and have introduced many changes. The RCC is reluctant to do any of this, but the Pope is leading the way to a more merciful approach to people in general. Unfortunately, many in both denominations are having problems with changes that have taken place since the beginning of the church and is part and parcel of their church practices, if not their doctrine. I further believe it is the Holy Spirit leading this movement in both. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL December 11, 2013 at 5:48 pm Suggestion: in terms of connecting with parishes and dioceses at a local level. If we limit scope of CCAB’s then have Diocesan Councils and Standing Committees around the country vote electronically on passed perfected resolutions other than the budget. If a majority of these Diocesan committees vote yes, the resolution passes. If not it is defeated. This is one way to be accountable to local people. That guarantees buy in locally and it guarantees that those who make resolutions will keep that in mind. This also gives more participants in the process since it appears you will suggest cutting back on the number of on site participants at GC. December 16, 2013 at 11:19 pm My daughter left our Episcopal church. Shortly after her 16th birthday she visited a friends non-denominational church. She left for a couple of reasons. 1)The non-denominational church offered a more vibrant program for teenagers. For example, on Wednesday nights they have a loud band that plays the “new contemporary Christian music” that appeals to young people. And even though I am 53-years-old, it also appeals to me. 2)She also told me she was not hearing enough about Jesus. I had a meeting with the rector we had at the time. I told him I was concerned why my daughter left our Episcopal church. His only response was, “well, my three daughters do not even attend church. I am still bothered about his lack of concern. And people wonder why the Episcopal church is not doing better in regards to growth. If it can not attract young people, it will wither away. The Rev. Douglas M. Carpenter says: Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Primates Meeting, [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Moon Hing, primate of the Province of South East Asia, looks ahead to the 2017 Primates Meeting. Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Sep 22, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Preparing for Primates 2017: Province of South East Asia Archbishop Moon Hing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion, Primates Meeting 2017 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more