May 2021

first_img China Plans to Deploy Three Aircraft Carriers to Dominate Indian Ocean View post tag: Aircraft Share this article View post tag: plans The race between the two Asian giants to dominate the seas has intensified. Alarmed at China’s plan to deploy by 2016 at least three aircraft…(dailypioneer)[mappress]Source: dailypioneer, November 08, 2011; Back to overview,Home naval-today China Plans to Deploy Three Aircraft Carriers to Dominate Indian Ocean View post tag: china View post tag: ocean View post tag: Indian View post tag: dominatecenter_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: DEPLOY Authorities View post tag: Carriers View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: three November 8, 2011last_img read more

first_img USA: NETC Sailors Welcome New Force Master Chief View post tag: Force View post tag: News by topic Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) Sailors welcomed their new Force Master Chief April 26.Force Master Chief (AW/SW) April Beldo comes to NETC from the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) where she served as the first female African American command master chief onboard a nuclear aircraft carrier. She continues her trend of breaking barriers as NETC’s first female and African-American Force Master Chief.Beldo is filled with enthusiasm for how women continue to break barriers, such as the women who received their training at Naval Submarine School to serve on board submarines, but is quick to point out that first and foremost, as NETC’s Force Master Chief, her number one priority is making sure that all Sailors receive quality training to fill the needs of the fleet, her mantra being, “Training Sailors seven days a week, 24 hours a day.” “At NETC it’s our mission to maintain, train, and provide a mission-ready maritime force capable of winning wars, deterring aggression, and maintaining the freedom of the seas,” said Beldo. “NETC allows our Navy to maintain a robust and competent maritime force to guarantee security, stability and trust around the globe.”Beldo counts herself as a proud member of the ranks of women who forged the path into the once male-dominated senior leadership, and is excited to return to the NETC domain as its top enlisted advisor. She previously served as command master chief at Naval Service Training Command, and Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill.Beldo’s success story is similar to many others, but upon reflection, she offers that if the Navy had not changed its attitude towards women serving in leadership roles, she may not have been given the opportunity to rise to her current position, and the Navy might not be the same professional military force that it is today.“After attending a couple of semesters of college I decided that I wanted more structure and stability in my life,” said Beldo. “My interest in the military led me to the Air Force, but I was turned down because all of their female quotas had been met for the year, which led me to a Navy recruiter. They jumped at the opportunity to enlist me.”She rapidly advanced, learning from and obeying her mostly male superiors. It was during this period that she witnessed a period of great change in the Navy’s attitude towards women serving in positions of leadership.“The eighties was a very exciting time to be a woman in the Navy. We felt it and saw it happen before our eyes. Women were beginning to be selected in greater numbers for positions of notoriety and distinction,” said Beldo. “Sure, women had been selected for flag rank as early as 1972, but it wasn’t until the eighties that they truly began to make their presence seen and felt.”Despite the achievements and the Navy’s changing attitude, Beldo says that the changes were, for the most part, not enough or too slow in coming, at least at her level.“I don’t know if it was me not paying attention or just how it was, but before I was a first class petty officer, I wasn’t exposed to female khaki leadership.”Beginning her career as an Aviation Maintenance Administrationman, she advanced to the rank of chief petty officer in 1995. Her advancement came in the wake of the landmark 1994 repeal of the Combat Exclusion Law, which allowed women for the first time to serve on combatant ships.“The repeal opened up a floodgate of opportunity for women. Overnight we became empowered. We could now serve aboard combatant ships, choose ratings and going to schools that were once closed to us, to pursue careers and advance just like our male counterparts,” said Beldo.“Because the Navy’s number one asset is its people, it’s refreshing to see how far we’ve come as an organization that values a person not by their gender, but because of their abilities. As Sailors we succeed through hard work and determination, sticking to the Navy’s Core Values of honor, courage and commitment, and understanding it’s our job as Sailors to support the Maritime Strategy.”In February 2012, in support of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD)-led review of Women in the Services Restrictions (WISR), the Navy supported proposed changes to the Department of Defense gender assignment policy. This exception to policy would allow, for the first time, the assignment of women to the battalion level in non-direct ground combat specialties, making sixty medical officer, chaplain, and chief and first class petty officer hospital corpsman billets available for assignment to women.“I see where we have gone with women serving aboard submarines, and look forward to seeing what other doors will open, such as women serving in the special forces. If that’s approved, you can be assured NETC will do their part to ensure all Sailors receive top-notch training” said Beldo.Today, nearly every naval community is open to women, and a majority receive recruit training and follow on A-school’s within the NETC domain.“I cannot emphasize enough; I want to see every opportunity open for every qualified Sailor,” said Beldo. “As a Navy, I am sure we will continue to pursue every opportunity for every qualified Sailor to excel, and not just to say ‘we broke a barrier.’”[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 30, 2012; Image: navy Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: NETC Sailors Welcome New Force Master Chief View post tag: sailors View post tag: NETC View post tag: Naval Authoritiescenter_img View post tag: New View post tag: Master Share this article View post tag: chief View post tag: Welcome View post tag: Navy April 30, 2012last_img read more

first_img View post tag: Pacific View post tag: Group View post tag: Singapore Secretary of Navy Visits Logistics Group Western Pacific, Navy Region Center Singapore View post tag: Navy View post tag: center View post tag: Region Training & Education View post tag: logistics Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus addressed U.S. Sailors and Navy civilians during an all hands call at Logistics Group Western Pacific (COMLOG WESTPAC) and Navy Region Center Singapore (NRCS) Aug. 8.Mabus thanked all hands for their continued service while assigned in Singapore.“The people at home will never know how much skill and talent it takes to wear the uniform and do your job on a day to day basis in this part of the world,” said Mabus. “You make America safer, more secure, and just a better place.”Mabus highlighted the renewed focus on the Western Pacific in the new strategic guidance released by the Department of Defense in January, noting that the continued U.S. military presence in East Asia since World War II had contributed to regional peace and stability.“The military has always been here in the region,” said Mabus. “From a Navy-centric standpoint, the new strategy puts more emphasis on the Navy and Marine Corps.”Mabus held the all hands call during a four-day visit to Singapore that included meetings with US and Singaporean military and civilian officials along with attendance of Singapore’s 47th National Day parade.The Secretary’s visit reinforced the importance of the strategic partnership between the U.S and Singapore.“For all of the military services involved with engagement in this region, from the exercises to continued access of this regional hub, we have no better partner than Singapore,” said Mabus. “We’ll bring the first of up to four Littoral Combat Ships here next Spring.”While no U.S. base exists in Singapore, the U.S. Navy presence here dates back several decades and the Navy leases facilities from the Singaporean government. Today, the U.S. military community in Singapore includes active duty, civilian personnel and family members, distributed among 15 commands.COMLOG WESTPAC was established at the Port of Singapore Authority (PSA), Sembawang Terminal, in July 1992, after the command’s relocation from Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines. Established in 2007, NRCS provides administrative support to nine Navy, Army, Air Force and Joint commands in Singapore. It also manages 165 family and bachelor housing units and dozens of command, administrative and warehouse facilities.COMLOG WESTPAC and NRCS are the U.S. 7th Fleet’s providers of combat-ready logistics and shore support services. These commands maintain and operate government-owned and contracted vessels to keep combatant ships and units throughout the region armed, fueled and fed.Additionally, COMLOG WESTPAC is 7th Fleet’s Theater Security Cooperation agent for Southeast Asia, promoting military-to-military relations and coordinating exercises such as Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 9, 2012; Image: US Navycenter_img View post tag: Naval August 9, 2012 View post tag: Western Back to overview,Home naval-today Secretary of Navy Visits Logistics Group Western Pacific, Navy Region Center Singapore View post tag: News by topic View post tag: visits View post tag: Secretary Share this articlelast_img read more

first_img February 4, 2013 View post tag: IT The U.S. Fleet Cyber Command (FCC) Information Technology Spend Governance Team was announced as a winner of the 2013 Department of the Navy (DON) Information Management/Information Technology (IM/IT) Excellence Award Jan. 31.The annual DON IM/IT Excellence Awards recognize IM/IT teams, projects, and individuals that have helped to transform the Navy and Marine Corps through information technology.The award recognizes the FCC team’s dedicated work in creating new processes and ongoing analysis that facilitated the approval of over 800 IT investment requirements for Navy funded, Navy and Marine Corps Intranet/Continuity of Service Contract (NMCI/CoSC), and nationally funded IT procurement requests. “Our 19 member team can be proud of their accomplishments over the past year that benefit not only the command, but the Navy as a whole by creating efficiencies that maximize resources – an ever more critical necessity in this challenging fiscal climate,” said Kevin Cooley, FCC’s chief information officer and executive director.The DON CIO award citation reads:The efforts of the US Fleet Cyber Command IT Spend Governance Team measurably improved mission effectiveness and positively affected information sharing and information management. Through innovative use of IM/IT, the team met Navy requirements without duplicating existing programming and financial management controls at FCC headquarters and globally dispersed subordinate commands. The team’s forceful advocacy increased user capability, reduced decision cycle timelines Navy-wide and improved FCC mission effectiveness. In just 10 months, the team created processes from scratch and conducted intensive analysis directly affecting the approval of over 800 IT investment requirements for Navy funded, NMCI/CoSC and nationally funded IT procurement requests. The value of these investments exceeded $100M and encompassed telecommunication services, Programs of Record support, contract support services, software and hardware. The team’s diligence and innovation resulted in significant achievements in advancing the DON, OPNAV, and FCC vision for managing this knowledge and information, thus enabling effectiveness at the Echelon II and Echelon I levels. Collaboration, communication, and execution of IT expenditures throughout the FCC HQ and domain now follow documented, repeatable processes that have resulted in better decision-making and increased mission effectiveness, visibility, and oversight for all FCC IT Investments across all classification enclaves. “We’re proud of the team’s hard work that has enabled FCC leadership to make decisions during the past year to avoid duplicate projects, ensure consistency throughout the domain, and identify new avenues to pursue IT efficiencies,” said team leader and member Neal Miller, FCC Deputy Chief Information Officer for Mission Assurance.Importantly, these efficiencies aid FCC in fulfilling its goal of providing Navy and Joint commanders with an operational advantage by assuring access to cyberspace and confident command and control, preventing strategic surprise in cyberspace, and delivering decisive cyber effects.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, February 4, 2013; Image: US Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today US Fleet Cyber Command Wins Excellence Award for IT Accomplishments US Fleet Cyber Command Wins Excellence Award for IT Accomplishments View post tag: Accomplishments View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Excellence View post tag: Command View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Cyber View post tag: US View post tag: award View post tag: wins Training & Education Share this article View post tag: fleet View post tag: Navallast_img read more

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Welsh Sailors Celebrate Their National Day at HMS ‘Monmouth’ View post tag: day March 1, 2013 Welsh Sailors Celebrate Their National Day at HMS ‘Monmouth’ View post tag: Welsh View post tag: sailors View post tag: europe View post tag: their View post tag: HMS View post tag: National Leeks occasionally make an appearance when cooked up by the talented on-board chefs, and as she approaches the halfway point of her seven-month patrol of the Gulf, the ‘Black Duke’ is looking forward to celebrating her Welsh connections.There is a small, but patriotic, Welsh contingent onboard who all have their little piece of home with them, whether it be a sporting kit, pictures of the old home town, a towel or a flag. “Although the heat of the Middle East is much more pleasant than the freshness of springtime in the valleys, it’s always important to mark important national celebrations such as St David’s Day and keep morale up onboard,” said proud Welshman Able Seaman (Chef) Jordan ‘Taff’ Burnett of Cardiff.“It’s often the little things, like celebrating the same normal routine events as the rest of the UK, that help remind you of your loved ones when you’re thousands of miles away from home.”With strong links to Monmouthshire and fond memories of runs ashore in Cardiff, the whole ship’s company have an affinity with the Principality, be they Welsh, English, Scottish, Northern Irish or from other parts of the Commonwealth.The Black Duke will be celebrating her 20th anniversary on her return to the UK in the early summer, and later in the year is hoping to visit Cardiff as part of the celebrations.HMS Monmouth is serving East of Suez as part of the Royal Navy’s continued commitment in the area. Working alongside coalition forces, her main tasks included protecting shipping, preventing smuggling and acting to deter and disrupt piracy.St David’s day is held to celebrate the feast of Saint David, who is said to have died on the 1st March in the year 589.With strong links to Monmouthshire and fond memories of runs ashore in Cardiff, the whole ship’s company have an affinity with the Principality, be they Welsh, English, Scottish, Northern Irish or from other parts of the Commonwealth.The Black Duke will be celebrating her 20th anniversary on her return to the UK in the early summer, and later in the year is hoping to visit Cardiff as part of the celebrations.HMS Monmouth is serving East of Suez as part of the Royal Navy’s continued commitment in the area. Working alongside coalition forces, her main tasks included protecting shipping, preventing smuggling and acting to deter and disrupt piracy.St David’s day is held to celebrate the feast of Saint David, who is said to have died on the 1st March in the year 589.[mappress]Press Release, March 1, 2013 View post tag: celebrate View post tag: Monmouth Share this article View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

first_img Share this article April 4, 2013 View post tag: Naval View post tag: Gibraltar View post tag: Navy View post tag: Dragon View post tag: HMS Newly deployed Type 45, HMS Dragon, has passed through Gibraltar on her maiden voyage to the Middle East.She arrived in stormy conditions, but this soon cleared allowing the Ship’s Company the opportunity to engage the sovereignty’s residents in a spot of sport.The ship fielded Rugby, Football and Netball teams against Gibraltar and came out on top in rugby, but went down in both football and netball.The 22 hour stopover also allowed some of Dragon’s early risers the opportunity to undertake the legendary ‘Rock Run’.After HMS Dragon slipped her lines her Lynx helicopter took for a “sovereignty fly past” to thank Gibraltar for its hospitality.HMS Dragon is the fourth of the Royal Navy’s six new Type 45s. Built by BAE Systems on the Clyde, she made her first entry into her home port of Portsmouth in 2011 and was commissioned into the Navy’s fleet in April last year. She is now continuing her journey to the Middle East where, with other navies, she will help to keep the seas safe by preventing maritime terrorism, countering piracy, hunting drug runners and deterring human trafficking.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, April 4, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: passes HMS Dragon Passes through Gibraltar View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Dragon Passes through Gibraltar Training & Educationlast_img read more

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Melbourne View post tag: completes View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Defence View post tag: Defense Share this article Following several weeks of intense training, in trying environmental conditions, HMAS Melbourne fought valiantly for Mission Readiness as she prepared her forthcoming deployment.Inclement weather, a condensed time frame for the training program and adjacent Fleet activities created some unique challenges as the Ship’s company proved their ability to achieve the required competencies. The sea phase of Melbourne’s Mission Readiness work-up took place over a two-week period. More than 40 embarked personnel from Sea Training Group (STG) added to the Ship’s complement of 230.Mission Readiness work-ups are specifically designed to train personnel using scenarios that incorporate expected challenges and potential exigencies for each operational deployment. Melbourne’s work-up culminated in a three-day evaluation period – where the Ship was assessed in its ability to execute mission-related tasks as part of a coalition task force whilst dealing with associated contingencies.Outgoing Commander Sea Training – Major Fleet Units, Captain Mick Harris said ships that undergo a Mission Readiness Evaluation (MRE) can expect the program to be challenging, tiring and unpredictable, similar to those experienced in real operational conditions.“The Ship has no idea what to expect, or the order in which they will receive the tasking. Sea Training Group controls the Ship for that period, and an MRE is the closest emulation of operational tasking Navy imposes within a training environment,” Captain Harris said.“For a ship to be deemed mission ready, the assessed ship will be put through its paces. This ranges from specific war-fighting scenarios to international engagement activities. Each challenge and scenario pushes a ship to develop contingencies, which meet the competencies required of them by Fleet Commander for their deployment.”Air operations were one of the elements assessed in Melbourne’s MRE. Melbourne’s embarked helicopter Dominator was exposed to a range of maritime interception operations in the training scenarios during work-ups in the great East Australian Exercise Area and confines of Jervis Bay. The integration of air support is frequently used during boarding operations by Major Fleet Unit’s and it is critical that personnel are well trained.Dominator proved to be a very reliable force multiplier for Melbourne and conducted two Surface Search sorties a day and provided close protection during boarding scenarios.[mappress]Press Release, July 15, 2013; Image: Australian Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Melbourne Completes MRE HMAS Melbourne Completes MRE View post tag: MRE Training & Education View post tag: Navy July 15, 2013 View post tag: HMASlast_img read more

first_img View post tag: review Back to overview,Home naval-today India: Vice Admiral NN Kumar Chairs Mid-Year Refit Review View post tag: Vice View post tag: NN View post tag: Mid-Year View post tag: Admiral View post tag: Defense India: Vice Admiral NN Kumar Chairs Mid-Year Refit Review View post tag: Kumar View post tag: Naval View post tag: Defence View post tag: Navy July 29, 2013 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Refit Share this article Training & Education Vice Admiral NN Kumar, AVSM, VSM, Chief of Material, Integrated Headquarters, Ministry of Defence (Navy) arrived Visakhapatnam on Tuesday, 23 Jul 13, on a three day maiden visit to the Eastern Naval Command after assuming office as the Chief of Material.The Flag Officer called on Vice Admiral Anil Chopra PVSM, AVSM, VSM, Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command and discussed plans for refits, infrastructure and current logistics issues of ships based at the Eastern Naval Command.The Admiral also chaired the Mid Year Refit and Infrastructure Review (MYRR) 2013 held at Naval Dockyard (Visakhapatnam). The Conference is an apex body that formulates long term maintenance plans for all ships and submarines and reviews the progress of refits and of various infrastructure projects. The forum attended by a large number of senior officers from IHQ, ENC and Naval Dockyards is also used to re-visit some of the existing maintenance policies and deliberate upon the refit schedule of ships and plan infrastructure to support latest acquisitions of the Indian Navy.[mappress]Press Release, July 29, 2013; Image: Indian Navy View post tag: chairslast_img read more

first_img Industry news View post tag: BAE View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Clinches View post tag: USS View post tag: Systems View post tag: Vicksburg BAE Systems has received a $6.9 million modification to a previously awarded multi-ship, multi-option cost-plus incentive fee contract to provide for the availability of Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser serving in the United States Navy, the USS Vicksburg (CG 69).The contract includes ship repairs, hull, machinery, electrical, electronics, ship alterations and piping as required. The primary focus of this repair package is to accomplish structural repairs and to accomplish the five-year boiler certification and the flight deck certification.Work activities will be performed in Jacksonville, Fla., and are expected to be completed by September 2013.Built by Ingalls Shipbuilding, the missile cruiser features four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines and can develop a speed in excess of 30 knots.The vessel measures 567 feet (173 meters) in length, 34 feet (10.2 meters) in draft and has a displacement of approx. 9,600 tons at full load.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 13, 2013 View post tag: USD View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defencecenter_img View post tag: Mln Back to overview,Home naval-today BAE Systems Clinches USD 7 Mln USS Vicksburg Deal View post tag: Defense View post tag: deal BAE Systems Clinches USD 7 Mln USS Vicksburg Deal View post tag: Naval August 13, 2013 View post tag: 7 Share this articlelast_img read more

first_img View post tag: marine Draft11 m View post tag: usa The overhaul, which is expected to last until April, will include port main engine, gyro replacement, number four ship’s service diesel generator, docking and undocking and underwater hull cleaning and painting.If all options are exercised, the total amount of the contract could be raised for additional USD 1.4 million, bringing the total value to USD 8 million.The primary mission of USNS Yukon, a Henry J. Kaiser-class replenishment ship, is supplying fuel to U.S. Navy ships. Yukon is the 16th ship in a class of 18 underway replenishment oilers, built for the MSC. The oiler operates within the United States Pacific Fleet. HENRY J. KAISER CLASS OF REPLENISHMENT OILERS View post tag: USNS View post tag: Defence January 30, 2014 Beam29.69 m View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic Length206 m Complement103 crew Capacity178,000 to 180,000 barrels of fuel oil and jet fuel View post tag: Defense Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy Hires Vigor Marine for USNS Yukon’s Overhaul [mappress]Naval Today Staff, January 30, 2014; Image: Wikimedia View post tag: hires View post tag: Vigor View post tag: Naval View post tag: Overhaul Speed20 knots USNS YUKON AT SEAThe U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command (MSC) Norfolk has awarded a contract worth USD 6.6 million to Vigor Marine LLC, seated in Portland, Ore, for regular overhaul and dry docking availability of fleet replenishment oiler USNS Yukon (T-AO 202). Displacement9,500 tons light/40,700 long tons View post tag: US Industry news View post tag: Yukon US Navy Hires Vigor Marine for USNS Yukon’s Overhaul Share this articlelast_img read more