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first_imgContinental Reinsurance Plc (CONTIN.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2015 annual report.For more information about Continental Reinsurance Plc (CONTIN.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Continental Reinsurance Plc (CONTIN.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Continental Reinsurance Plc (CONTIN.ng)  2015 annual report.Company ProfileContinental Reinsurance Plc offers reassurance services for life and non-life classes through service centres in Nigeria, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, Tunisia and Botswana. The company’s reinsurance offering covers fire and engineering; motor, liability and general accident; marine and aviation; oil and energy; and individual and group life risks. Continental Reinsurance Plc also provides specialist advisory services for reinsurance structuring, actuarial and risk management and product development support. Continental Property and Engineering Risk Services (CPERS) Limited in South Africa is a subsidiary of Continental Reinsurance Plc and operates as a technical referral competence with the Group. The subsidiary company was established to meet the growing demand for specialist engineering insurance risk cover and advisory services. Its core functions are underwriting, risk surveys, claims handling and training. Continental Reinsurance Plc’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Continental Reinsurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

first_img Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Premium lifestyle brand owner and retailer Joules (LSE: JOUL) appears to be navigating its way through the coronavirus crisis well.Today’s half-year results report leads with the statement: “Accelerating digital sales support delivery of profits ahead of expectations for the period.”5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The harsh environment for retail sharesMeanwhile, the current harsh economic environment has caused many other retailers to fail. But I reckon Joules has the potential to survive the crisis and emerge as a sector winner in the years ahead. I think the business has a good chance of resuming its growth trajectory as the pandemic fades. So, I’d consider it now for my long-term Stocks and Shares ISA.Today’s figures show that revenue for the six months to 29 November 2020 declined by just over 15% year-on-year. But the company earned £3.7m in profit before tax and exceptional items. And that outcome is ahead of the directors’ previous expectations.E-commerce sales from the firm’s own websites grew by more than 45% in the period. And the company said “strong” online sales for the seven weeks to 3 January “more than offset” the effect of store closures through the Christmas trading period.  Like big retailer Next and others, online business has been key to battling the effects of the pandemic. In many cases, customers have migrated to buying online if the stores have been closed. And the company is so focused on digital sales that in the report chief executive Nick Jones described the business model as “flexible and digital-led”.One of the firm’s recent tactics was to establish the ‘Friends of Joules’ digital marketplace. And gross sales including that channel increased by almost 55% in the period “accelerating to 66% growth over the seven weeks to 3rd January 2021.” It seems the strength of the brand is keeping customers keen whatever the sales channel. And the company’s measure of active customers increased by nearly 160,000 over the six-month period to almost 1.6m.Cash flow and growth potentialThat trading success has been translating to decent cash inflows for the business. And the company reported a net cash position of almost £16m (ignoring lease liabilities), up from just over £2m year-on-year. That cash outcome is another figure coming in ahead of expectations.Jones reckons Joules is “well-positioned” to grow as a leading lifestyle brand and digital marketplace. And I reckon there’s potential for the company to expand internationally as well as in the UK. The brand has already made “good progress” in the US and Germany, for example.Meanwhile, with the share price near 149p, the forward-looking earnings multiple is near 20 for the trading year to May 2022. That looks like a full valuation to me reflecting the quality of the enterprise.But one risk for potential shareholders now is that Joules may fail to make the double-digit percentage rebound in earnings that City analysts expect. If that happens, the valuation will look even higher and the share price could fall to compensate.Nevertheless, I’m watching the retail share closely as a potential long-term hold with the aim of benefiting from growth in the years ahead. Enter Your Email Address Kevin Godbold | Thursday, 28th January, 2021 | More on: JOUL Is this thriving company one of the best retail shares for 2021? Image source: Getty Images. center_img Kevin Godbold has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of Next. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Joules Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Kevin Godboldlast_img read more

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Like this stock… I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Image source: Getty Images US stock Bumble (NASDAQ: BMBL) is getting quite a bit of attention after its initial public offering (IPO) yesterday. Here in the UK, BMBL is one of the most viewed shares on Hargreaves Lansdown’s platform today.Should I consider Bumble stock for my own portfolio? Let’s take a look at the investment case.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Bumble Inc: business descriptionBumble Inc is the parent company of Bumble and Badoo – two of the world’s most popular dating apps. Worldwide, the apps have over 40m users combined. They are among the top-five-grossing iOS lifestyle apps in 30 and 89 countries respectively, according to the parent company.The group is led by CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd (a co-founder of Tinder), who launched the Bumble app in 2014.Strong growthThere are certainly things I like about Bumble. For starters, it has a great dating product. My brother actually met his wife on the Bumble app!Secondly, the company is growing at a rapid rate. According to its S-1 filing, 2019 total revenues grew 36% to $488.9m. Meanwhile, for the first nine months of 2020, revenue came in at $416.6m, up nearly 15% year-on-year. That’s not bad given we were in the middle of a global pandemic.To put those figures in perspective, rival Match Group (which owns Tinder and Hinge) generated revenue growth of 19% in 2019, and 16% growth in the first nine months of 2020. Match’s full-year revenue for 2020 was up 17% to $2.4bn.Looking ahead, I expect the popularity of dating apps to increase as the world becomes more digital. Increased adoption should benefit Bumble.BMBL: risksThere are a few risks to the investment case however. The first thing I’m concerned about is there’s a lot of hype around Bumble stock after its IPO. This has resulted in a huge jump in the share price. It debuted at $43 yesterday. However, it ended the day at $70 – 63% higher.This share price rise gives the company a market-cap of $13bn, which translates to a price-to-sales (P/S) ratio of about 18, using this year’s consensus revenue forecast of $723m. That’s quite a high valuation, in my view. Rival Match Group sports a forward-looking P/S ratio of around 16.After the recent share price rise, BMBL stock could be volatile. It’s worth noting that CNBC’s Jim Cramer said yesterday he believes Match is the better stock of the two for more cautious investors (like me).Secondly, the company doesn’t appear to be consistently profitable. In the first nine months of 2020, Bumble generated a loss of around $117m, compared to a gain of $69m in the prior-year period. This lack of consistency adds risk.Finally, I also have some concerns about the nature of the industry. Users of dating apps can be quite fickle in that they often pile into new apps. Are Bumble’s superior enough to give the company an enduring competitive advantage? I’m not sure.Bumble stock: my approachGiven the risks to the investment case, I’m not going to buy Bumble stock for my portfolio right now. The company does have growth potential. But the lack of profitability, and the share price jump concern me.All things considered, I think there are other US growth stocks I could buy that are a better fit for my portfolio. Should I buy Bumble stock after the IPO? Edward Sheldon, CFA | Friday, 12th February, 2021 “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” See all posts by Edward Sheldon, CFA Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Enter Your Email Address Edward Sheldon owns shares in Hargreaves Lansdown. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Match Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Hargreaves Lansdown. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shareslast_img read more

first_img  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. National Schizophrenia Fellowship changes its name Howard Lake | 7 July 2002 | News Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The National Schizophrenia Fellowship (NSF) is changing is name to Rethink.The NSF’s new name is designed to reflect its broader role in mental health issues. It’s strapline, which accompanies a new logo, is “rethink severe mental illness.”last_img read more

first_imgColumnsDeriving The Meaning Of ‘Wage’: A Comparative Analysis Of The Payment Of Wages Act, 1936 And The Code On Wages, 2019 Nandini Gulati & Abhishek Abhi18 Dec 2020 9:29 PMShare This – xA long-standing industry demand was the rationalisation and codification of labour laws. While the industry demands simplification and minimum compliance, the labour unions on the other side paint a grim picture about the lack of compliances of even existing labour laws. There were many attempts to revise the labour laws. The Union Government appointed the Second National Commission…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA long-standing industry demand was the rationalisation and codification of labour laws. While the industry demands simplification and minimum compliance, the labour unions on the other side paint a grim picture about the lack of compliances of even existing labour laws. There were many attempts to revise the labour laws. The Union Government appointed the Second National Commission on Labour Laws, which submitted its report in June 2002. The Commission proposed that the existing set of labour laws should be narrowly divided into four classes and grouped together. The Union Government acting on the recommendations has proposed that four labour codes will be enacted, subsuming 29 legislations on labour laws. The Code on Wages, 2019 is the first of the lot to receive legislative approval and, subsequently, the President of India’s assent on August 8, 2019. The Code on Wages, 2019 (the Code) seeks to amend and consolidate the laws relating to wages and bonus and matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. It amalgamates and subsumes four imperative labour laws – the Payment of Wages Act, 1936; the Minimum Wages Act, 1948; the Payment of Bonus Act, 1965; and the Equal Remuneration Act, 1976. The Code provides for the universal applicability of the provisions for prompt payment of wages and minimum wages to all workers regardless of the wage ceiling and sector, unlike the Payment of Wages Act, which is applicable to employees receiving wages below the statutory limit, and the Minimum Wages Act, which is applicable to employees engaged in scheduled establishments. The Code has expanded the definition of ’employer’ as well as ’employee’ after putting together separate prior legislations under a single umbrella, resulting in a wide-ranging applicability of the regulations which is now applicable to workers in both organised and unorganised sectors. In order to encourage deregulation and promote ease of doing business, several changes were brought in via the Code on Wages, 2019. Additionally, the Code attempts to streamline India’s labour law enforcement process by providing a uniform statutory framework for it. The new definition of the term wages under Section 2(y) of the Code is a significant reform implemented by the Code. It marks a departure under the aforementioned Acts from earlier meanings of wages. Thus, to comprehend its import it is imperative to analyse this definition and juxtapose it with that under the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 Wages under Code on Wages, 2019 – How different from that provided in the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 The definition of ‘wages’ varies across labour legislations in India. The Code on Wages, 2019 endeavours to provide a single uniform definition of wages as applicable to minimum wages, payment of wages and payment of bonus with an intent to minimise disputes and litigations and also reduce compliance cost for employers. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936 applies to the payment of wages to persons employed in factories and to persons employed in any industrial or other establishment. However, the Code has broadened the scope by extending its applicability to all the establishments. Section 2(y) of the Code defines Wages as all remuneration whether by way of salaries, allowances or otherwise, expressed in terms of money or capable of being so expressed which would, if the terms of employment, express or implied, were fulfilled, be payable to a person employed in respect of his employment or of work done in such employment. This part of definition is verbatim similar to that of the definition provided under Section 2(vi)[1] of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936 defined wages very comprehensively and broadly. Under the Code, there are now three parts to the definition of wages: inclusionary part, exclusionary part and the conditions which limits the effect of exclusions. The following components form the inclusive part of the definition under the Code on Wages – basic paydearness allowanceretaining allowance, if any. Unlike the definition under the Payment of Wages Act of 1936, the definition under the Code aims to provide a list of items that are not included in this updated concept of wage such as – any bonus payable under any law for the time being in force, which does not form part of the remuneration payable under the terms of employment; the value of any house-accommodation, or of the supply of light, water, medical attendance or other amenity or of any service excluded from the computation of wages by a general or special order of the appropriate Government;any contribution paid by the employer to any pension or provident fund, and the interest which may have accrued thereon;any conveyance allowance or the value of any travelling concession;any sum paid to the employed person to defray special expenses entailed on him by the nature of his employment;house rent allowance;remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a court or Tribunal;any overtime allowance;any commission payable to the employee;any gratuity payable on the termination of employment;any retrenchment compensation or other retirement benefit payable to the employee or any ex gratia payment made to him on the termination of employment. The first proviso to Section 2(y) under the Code states the exclusions mentioned must not exceed 50 per cent of all remuneration and, if they are exceeded, the excess sum shall be treated as remuneration and shall be regarded as wages. This is intended to ensure that organizations do not pursue compensation structures that result in a reduction of wages below 50% of overall remuneration. However, it is not wrong to contend that such an approach will be seldom effective. The second proviso to Section 2(y) under the Code basically provides that for the purposes of equal wages to all genders, the emoluments specifically excluded under clauses (d), (f), (g) and (h) becomes relevant and shall be taken for the computation of wages. Finally, the explanation offered under the definition of wages in the Code provides that if an employee earns remuneration in kind from his employer, the amount of which does not exceed 15% of the total salary payable to him shall be considered to constitute part of the salary of that employee. This is basically meant to disincentivize employers to pay in kind. Issues with the new Definition The inclusionary part of the new definition has only three items, which is two less than that provided under the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. Moreover, the list of exclusions under the Code is much longer than that of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936. What is even more startling in this regard is the fact that some of the inclusionary clauses under Payment of Wages Act, 1936 has now come to be a part of the list of exclusions. The remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court which was an inclusionary clause under Section 2(vi) – (a) of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 is now excluded from the definition of wages by virtue of Section 2(y) – (g) of the Code on Wages, 2019. Similarly, any overtime allowance [2(vi) – (b)], commission payable to employee [2(vi) – (c)], and retrenchment compensation [2(vi) – (d)], which were previously protected have been excluded from the definition of wages and is now a part of the list of exclusions. [Section 2(y) – (h), 2(y) – (i), 2(y) – (k)] Furthermore, the residuary clause in the veil of Section 2(vi)-(e) of the Payment of Wages Act, 1936 provided an added protection to the employees and working class. It sets forth that wages may include any sum payable to which the person employed is entitled under any scheme framed under any law for the time being in force. No such residuary clause is present in the Code on Wages, 2019. The plausible explanation behind the new definition is to ensure that employers include the majority of the salary of an employee in the first three components, i.e. basic, dearness allowance and retaining allowance, in order to prevent inclusion of other components in the wages component at a later stage. While this is a move undertaken with good intentions, but since the government actively controls incentives, it may lead to problems, making it impossible for employers to formulate their own wage structures. In particular, this would be troublesome for employees who use variable and deliverable associated performance-based components to earn significant chunks of their wages. In the case of sales managers, for example, who draw different amounts depending on the nature of their travel, performance goals, etc. Furthermore, the inclusion of gratuity payments and other retirement benefits into the definition of wages through first proviso seems vague as this runs counter to the basic purpose behind such payments and would lead to an unwanted increase in the cost of the employer. Additionally, it would make the whole payroll system complicated and eventually the end results would remain somewhat similar leading to a great deal of confusion. As already mentioned, the Code excludes ‘remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties’ from the definition of wages without providing any explanation. All salaries are negotiated in a unionised community under agreements between the employer and unionised employees, which mostly last two to three years or more. To suggest that none of these mutually agreed and settled compensation components can be regarded as ‘wages’ for some purposes is quite pointless. However, the second proviso clarifies that this element along with few others will be included for the purposes of equal wages to all genders, it still does not make the reason for its exclusion for other purposes intelligible. In order to summarise this new Code, from the point of view of giving a uniform effect to the four major labour laws of this country, it can be said that this Code is of great significance. In addition, the Code has implemented much-needed reforms in the labour sector through which the convergence, rationalisation and simplification of labour-related regulations is now on course. From the above discussions, it is correct to conclude that in an effort to simplify the law, the Code on Wages, 2019 appears to have created some further chaos and confusion. A simpler approach would have been to address the concept of wages based on core concepts (and if possible, through illustrations and examples, as many other statutes do), instead of a complex definition with plenty of other inclusions, exclusions, provisos and explanations. Although the intentions behind the introduction of a uniform definition of wages are fairly positive, their impact remains to be seen. The Code endeavours to offer a new meaning to the old labour laws of centuries which were enacted historically at different points in time and to deal with different situations. The combining of asymmetrical laws into a single code is not an easy task and will undoubtedly create a set of new problems. The first and only important thing required for achieving the desired results is to adequately enforce the requirements of the Code in a standardised way which can be done only by improving the standard of regulatory authorities.Views are personal. [1] “wages” means all remuneration (whether by way of salary, allowances or otherwise) expressed in terms of money or capable of being so expressed which would, if the terms of employment, express or implied, were fulfilled, be payable to a person employed in respect of his employment or of work done in such employment, and includes- (a) any remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court; (b) any remuneration to which the person employed is entitled in respect of overtime work or holidays or any leave period; (c) any additional remuneration payable under the terms of employment (whether called a bonus or by any other name); (d) any sum which by reason of the termination of employment of the person employed is payable under any law, contract or instrument which provides for the payment of such sum, whether with or without deductions but does not provide for the time within which the payment is to be made; (e) any sum to which the person employed is entitled under any scheme framed under any law for the time being in force; but does not include— (1) any bonus (whether under a scheme of profit sharing or otherwise) which does not form part of the remuneration payable under the terms of employment or which is not payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a Court; (2) the value of any house-accommodation, or of the supply of light, water, medical attendance or other amenity or of any service excluded from the computation of wages by a general or special order of 1[the appropriate Government]; (3) any contribution paid by the employer to any pension or provident fund, and the interest which may have accrued thereon; (4) any travelling allowance or the value of any travelling concession; (5) any sum paid to the employed person to defray special expenses entailed on him by the nature of his employment; or (6) any gratuity payable on the termination of employment in cases other than those specified in sub-clause (d). 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first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Harps come back to win in Waterford Previous articleCrossan hopeful that Burnfoot flood defence work will start soonNext articleMickey Harte says Conor Meyler will play role in All Ireland Final News Highland WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Homepage BannerNews Google+ By News Highland – August 20, 2018 Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th center_img 7% increase in people flying from Dublin to Donegal Google+ There’s been a 7% increase in the number of passengers flying to Donegal from Dublin on the Aer Lingus Regional route over the past six months.Aer Lingus Regional, operated by Stobart Air, has also announced a 12% increase in passengers availing of the Dublin-Kerry route since the PSO renewal on 1 February, compared to the same period last year.Since 1 February 48,000 passengers have travelled with the airline on both the Dublin-Kerry and Dublin-Donegal routes.Figures also show that 23% of passengers on the Donegal Dublin route take a day trip, while one quarter of passengers travel for business.Since the renewal of the PSO routes, Stobart Air has invested €14m in its fleet, with the Donegal route benefiting from a new aircraft.Anne Bonner, Managing Director of Donegal Airport says; they ‘hope to expand Donegal’s access on the Aer Lingus network to additional European and UK destinations and are actively working with the carrier to enable the links.’ Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

first_img Previous articleMotorist clocked travelling at 173km/h in Letterkenny areaNext articleClasses may be held in parish halls or GAA facilities News Highland Twitter Homepage BannerNews Google+ By News Highland – July 28, 2020 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img Killybegs was Ireland’s most important port for fish landings last year.According to new figures from the Central Statistics Office, the port accounted for 63.1% of all landings by Irish fishing vessels.The total value of fish landings at Killybegs last year was 127 million euro – 99.8 million from Irish vessels and 28 million from foreign vessels.When Arranmore, Burtonport, Greencastle, Malin Head and Rathmullan are taking into consideration, the total value of Irish vessel fish landings in Donegal was 113.6 million euro.Killybegs significantly surpasses all other Irish ports and had more than ten times more landings than the second biggest port in the country at Castletownbere in Cork.Atlantic Mackerel came out on top last year in terms of largest quantities landed by Irish vessels in Ireland, followed by Blue Whiting and Horse Mackerel. Facebook Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Killybegs is greatest catch according to CSO RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgThe biodiversity of the pelagic bacterioplankton community of a maritime Antarctic freshwater lake was examined by cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent techniques to determine predominant bacterioplankton populations present. The culture-dependent techniques used were direct culture and observation, polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis followed by selective sequencing and fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The culture-independent techniques used were 16S ribosomal DNA gene cloning, RFLP analysis and sequencing, in situ hybridisation with group-specific, fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes and cloning and sequencing of dominant denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis products. Significant differences occurred between the results obtained with each method. However, sufficient overlap existed between the different methods to identify potentially significant groups. At least six different bacterial divisions including 24 genera were identified using culture-dependent techniques, and eight different bacterial divisions, including 23 genera, were identified using culture-independent techniques. Only five genera, Corynebacterium, Cytophaga, Flavobacterium, Janthinobacterium and Pseudomonas, could be identified using both sets of techniques, which represented four different bacterial divisions. Significantly for Antarctic freshwater lakes, pigment production is found within members of each of these genera. This work illustrates the importance of a comprehensive polyphasic approach in the analysis of lake bacterioplankton, and supports the ecological relevance of results obtained in earlier entirely culture-based studies. (C) 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.last_img read more

first_imgBasal melting of Antarctica’s floating ice shelves accounts for between 15 and 35% of the total mass loss from the ice sheet and helps to precondition the shelf waters for deepconvection. Despite this pivotal role in ice sheet-ocean interactions, there are only a handful of measurements of actual melting rates. Almost all published figures are of steady state melt rates; that is, the melt rate required to maintain the ice shelf in a state of equilibrium, deducedfrom the residual of the other mass balance terms. Such observations have obvious limitations, such as the impossibility of determining the role of basal melting in driving ice shelf thinning or retreat. Over the past two Antarctic field seasons we have conducted a series of experiments to measure the actual melt rate at various locations on George VI and Filchner-Ronne ice shelves. The key to our technique is a precise measurement of the iceshelf thinning rate, by phase-sensitive radar. The thinning rate can be partitioned between vertical strain and melting without the need to assume that the ice shelf is in equilibrium, given contemporaneous measurements of the vertical strain rate.last_img read more

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Countrywide to seek £10m from LSH buyer following failed sale previous nextAgencies & PeopleCountrywide to seek £10m from LSH buyer following failed salePapers lodged with High Court show agency giant remains bent on legal action to recoup cash from Monaco-based entrepreneur.Nigel Lewis12th November 202002,778 Views Following the collapse of attempt by Countrywide to sell its commercial arm Lambert Smith Hampton (LSH) to John Bengt Moeller in January this year, court papers lodged by the estate agency reveal that it is now seeking at least £10 million in damages.Business website Bisnow says Countrywide is seeking the difference between the £38 million agreed between it and Moeller last year and the estimated value of the company ‘at the time of any judgement in its failure’ which, it claims is likely to be in excess of £10 million.The papers were filed as part of the company’s legal claim on 23rd September at the High Court, it is reported.Danish entrepreneur Moeller, who is a Monaco-based businessman with a background in finance, construction and property, has yet to mount a defence, it is reported.The collapse of the LSH deal in March, after several extensions of the payment deadline by Countrywide to accommodate Moeller, is considered to be one of the main triggers for its current woes.Significant portionIf Countrywide had received the £38 million for LSH then a significant portion of the debt its current burdened by would have been paid, gaining breathing room for Peter Long and Paul Creffield’s ‘back to basics’ plan to work.Instead, on 22nd October its management accepted a deal that would have seen a £165 million injection of new funds including £90 million from shareholder Alchemy to repay its £91.9 million debts and a fresh £75 million from its existing lenders.As we reported last week, this deal has now been shelved after Connells made a bid to offer Countrywide shareholders £2.50 a share for the company.LSH Lambert Smith Hampton connells Countrywide November 12, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more