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first_imgUniversity of Georgia horticulturist Bodie Pennisi doesn’t just study herbs in her research garden in Griffin, Ga. She also grows them at home to add flavor to her food.“I grow herbs because I use them in my kitchen,” she said, “and I do quite a bit of cooking. I use them fresh, and I use them dry, so I have to know which will grow in containers [and] in the ground, how to preserve them and use them the best.”Her general message is to “eat more herbs,” she said. “Using herbs in the kitchen is a dietary way to help yourself in not eating too much salt and increasing the flavor in your food.”All herbs like well-drained soils, so she’s found it easiest – and better for the plants – to grow them in pots. The exceptions are rosemary and thyme, which can be planted as ground cover in sunny areas. Sage can also be grown in the ground, but Pennisi has found, “in my view, it likes the pot a little bit better.”Because herbs grow well in pots, they are easy to transport indoors and back outdoors depending on the weather. “You can grow just about anything if you put it in the house,” she said, “but you have to give it a lot of sun. A southern-exposure window is the best. But, you’re never going to get the good growth you get outside.”Both dried and fresh herbs can be found at most grocery stores. Dried herbs usually come in bottles. Fresh herbs can be found in the produce section, usually bunched, in a bag or enclosed in a tube. But Pennisi prefers hers grown at home. And in the winter when fresh isn’t readily available, she’s prepared.“It’s a lot better if you grow them yourself,” she said. “And dry them yourself, but don’t hold them dried for more than a year. I dry my own lemon balm and mint for tea. It’s not hard.”To dry herbs, she uses an inexpensive plastic dehydrator. In the summer when the air inside her house is dry due to the air conditioning, she hangs them in her kitchen.Below are a few of Pennisi’s favorite herbs and a few tips for growing them.• Basil. “You can start from seed or purchase it in plant form,” she said. Basil can vary from the most common – a wide-leafed variety – to the small-leafed lemon basil and purple opal basil, which has dark maroon-purple leaves. It should be grown in full sun and well-drained soil. As soon as its flower heads appear, these should be pinched back to prevent the plant from going to seed.• Thyme. There are more than 400 varieties of thyme, with English thyme being the most common. For the South, Pennisi suggests growing lemon thyme, caraway thyme and mother-of-thyme. Thyme varieties that creep make an excellent ground cover.• Sage. A perennial plant, sage varieties can be used interchangeably in cooking. Once it is established, it usually does well in well-drained soils. One particular variety of sage, known as pineapple sage, can be used to flavor drinks, chicken dishes, cheeses, jams and jellies.• Rosemary. Rosemary can be enjoyed year-round from the garden, because it too is a perennial plant. The shrubby plant can grow to between 3 and 5 feet tall. It’s drought-resistant after it’s established, but should be planted in full sun. “If you see that the plant is not growing vigorously, it’s a sign that it’s not getting enough sun,” Pennisi said.• Mint. Mint should always be grown in a pot, she said, because once it’s planted in the ground, it can take over. “The same goes for oregano and marjoram,” she said. “They’re a little too happy to grow.” The invasive mint can tolerate partial shade. Pennisi likes to grow peppermint and spearmint varieties to add to her tea.• Winter and summer savory. Winter savory has smaller, darker green leaves, a stronger flavor and is a perennial. It grows best from cuttings. Summer savory grows more easily from seed. Both require full sun.• Chives. Chives are a member of the onion family. “It’s basically your onion,” she said. “Onion chives are planted each year. The garlic chives have flat leaves, and they’re perennial.” They are easy to grow, but require a balanced fertilizer to grow well. Onion chives have pink flowers, while garlic chives have white flowers.• Lemon balm. “I like lemon balm for tea,” she said. Lemon balm is a perennial that can spread up to 3 feet. It will grow in partial shade.last_img read more

first_imgLegal & General – L&G’s bulk annuity and longevity insurance business has appointed John Towner in the new role of head of origination. He joins from Redington, where he advised both pension trustee boards and corporate sponsors on their investment, funding and risk-management strategies. Before then, he worked at Barclays Capital and Deutsche Bank.Mercer – Uwe Buchem has been named business leader for retirement at the consultancy’s German, Austrian and Swiss (DACH) business. He is replacing Mercer’s regional chief executive Achim Lüder, who stepped down from the role to focus on his other responsibilities. Buchem joined Mercer in 2002 and, in 2004, was promoted to market leader for Germany for health and benefits. He began his career at insurance group Debeka and internet insurance business Censio.Monument Group – The investment fund placement agent has appointed Karl Adam as director in the London office. He will have investor coverage responsibility for German-speaking Europe and some UK-based investors, focusing on building relationships with new institutional investors and general partners in the region. He joins from Citi Private Bank, where he was vice-president. Aviva Investors – Louise Kay has been appointed global head of sales. She will be responsible for leading global sales efforts across institutional and wholesale, including global consultants. Kay has held senior roles at Standard Life Investments and Aegon Asset Management UK.KNEIP – Keith Dingwall has been appointed to the new role of head of new business. Before joining KNEIP, he worked for 13 years at State Street Bank and International Financial Data Services in Luxembourg. Before then, he worked for a decade in JP Morgan Asset Management’s operations in the UK and Luxembourg.Pemberton – The independent asset management group, backed by Legal & General and focused on private debt and direct lending, has appointed Jürgen Breuer to head its operations in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Breuer previously established and led leverage and acquisition finance businesses for Dresdner Bank and West LB in Germany.Comgest – Arnaud Cosserat has been appointed CIO, succeeding Vincent Strauss, who will remain chief executive at the asset manager. Cosserat joined Comgest in 1996 as a portfolio manager covering European equities. He has spent the past two years in the position of deputy CIO.Kames Capital – Mark Benbow has been appointed to the fixed income team as an investment analyst. He joins from Scottish Widows Investment Partnership, where he was an analyst on the global equities team.Invesco PowerShares – Michael Huber has been appointed to the newly created role of business development director for Germany and Austria. Previously, he covered institutional clients for Luxembourg-based asset manager Assenagon. He has also worked at Goldman Sachs Group. ING Investment Management, Cardano Risk Management, Schroders, KAS Bank, Aegon Asset Management, Legal & General, Redington, Mercer, Monument Group, Aviva Investors, KNEIP, Pemberton, Comgest, Kames Capital, Invesco PowerSharesING Investment Management – Bart Oldenkamp has been appointed to the Integrated Client Solutions team at ING IM, soon to become NN Investment Partners. The manager said Oldenkamp would focus on strategic business development, working with institutional clients as well as the investment management teams to “optimise” ING IM’s solutions offering. He joins from Cardano Risk Management, a specialist risk and investment management boutique based in the Netherlands and the UK, where he was a member of the management board. Before then, he held various positions at ABN Amro Asset Management in Amsterdam and Chicago.Schroders – Theo van der Meer has been appointed senior adviser in the Netherlands. He will focus on providing specific pension scheme guidance and governance to Schroders’ institutional clients in the region. Prior to joining Schroders, he held the position of managing director within global distribution at Barclays in London. He has also held senior roles at Fidelity, Vanguard, NIB Capital, Robeco and AMRO Bank.KAS Bank – The custodian has appointed Alexander van Ittersum as market manager for the pension fund markets in the Netherlands, Germany and the UK. His responsibility is to increase activities in core markets by identifying market trends and customer needs, and translating them into new products. Before joining KAS, Van Ittersum worked at Aegon for six years, initially as product development manager with Aegon Global Pensions’ cross-border asset pooling, and later as proposition manager with Aegon Asset Management. Before joining Aegon, he was product manager for Robeco and relationship manager at Euronext.last_img read more