阿拉爱上海龙凤2020

first_img Aidan O’Brien’s globetrotting colt excelled in Australia’s richest weight-for-age event, a Group One over a mile and a quarter, with a withering late run in the hands of his ice-cool pilot. Despite his lack of experience at the racetrack, Moore was happy to bide his time as The Cleaner took the field along at a fast pace, with Andrew Balding’s Side Glance also close to the speed, b ut Adelaide made his move inside the final four furlongs and left his rivals for dead with a swooping charge from out wide. Adelaide came from last to first under a brilliant Ryan Moore ride to claim the Sportingbet Cox Plate at Moonee Valley. Fawkner finished second, with Silent Achiever third, but nothing could live with the exceptional winner. Moore said: “He’s a very good horse. He stepped out slowly and they went quick early on. I gave away a bit of ground (at the start), but he was creeping (into contention). “He’s done it the hard way. Usually the best horse wins, and usually the best horses have to do things a bit tougher. This horse has shown what a good colt he is. Things were against him but he’s got the job done.” Adelaide became the first European winner of the Cox Plate, while O’Brien was claiming his first top-level triumph in Australia. Moore said: “I was a long way back and I thought down the back we had to be a bit closer. I was giving away a good bit of ground. I got on the back of Fawkner and he pulled me into the race.” Side Glance turned in another superb effort to finish a close-up fourth in the Pearl Bloodstock silks. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

first_img March 31, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Two-time mixed doubles champion Jamie Murray says he believes Wimbledon will be canceled. Organizers of the Swiss Indoors tennis tournament in Roger Federer’s hometown of Basel say ticket sales will start on schedule on Thursday.The tournament is due to run from Oct. 26 to Nov. 1. Organizers say tickets will be refunded “should the coronavirus crisis continue and the Swiss tennis highlight not take place.”The ATP Tour is currently suspended until at least June.Federer and his wife donated 1 million Swiss francs ($1.04 million) last week to help families in need in his home country during the pandemic.Federer is a 10-time champion at the Swiss Indoors and will turn 39 before this year’s tournament. He was twice a ball boy at the event and made his debut as a player in 1998 when he was 17. He lost in the first round to Andre Agassi. Associated Press The Latest: Jamie Murray thinks Wimbledon will be canceled The All England Club board will hold an emergency meeting on Wednesday to discuss the fate of the 2020 tournament.The grasscourt season lasts only six weeks and Wimbledon is staged when daylight hours are the longest in Britain. The club has acknowledged the short window available to it and ruled out playing without spectators.The French Open has been postponed from May to September.The brother of two-time Wimbledon singles champion Andy Murray was asked whether he thinks a cancellation is more likely than a postponement. He told BBC Radio 4: “I think so. I think for them it is difficult to move the tournament back for many reasons, because you are running into other tournaments.”___ Federer posted footage on his social media accounts on Monday of him practising trick shots in his rehabilitation after surgery on his left knee in February.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6last_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 11, 2015 at 8:46 pm Contact Matt: mralex01@syr.edu Melissa Piacentini stands a few steps in front of the double doors that lead into the Syracuse locker room. She turns, thoughtfully, and points to the set of benches to her left just over her shoulder.“I still remember,” she said. “It was this bench right over here against Lindenwood.”Syracuse’s all-time leading scorer is talking about the only time she was ever benched.Piacentini wasn’t playing up to her abilities, and Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan pulled her out and didn’t put her back in. It happened right before Christmas break during her freshman year. Piacentini had a month to mull things over.“It made me sit back and think about my mistakes and think about how I had been performing back then,” Piacentini said. “It really made me mentally focused and come back ready to be stronger.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPiacentini called it the “best coaching decision” Flanagan had ever made for her. The move came at the perfect time and she was forced to view things through a different lens. Four years later, one of the most decorated players in Syracuse ice hockey history is gearing up for her final ride. Last season, Syracuse lost in the College Hockey America conference finals. With one last chance, Piacentini is hoping to take care of last season’s unfinished business. “Honestly I can’t say enough good things about her,” Flanagan said. “I’m already dreading losing a player like her to graduation.”Despite standing just 5-foot-2 on the ice, Piacentini can’t be missed. She’s a scrappy, physical player, and has already notched three goals and an assist in two games this season. Goalkeeper Jenn Gilligan played her first season at Syracuse in 2014 after transferring from New Hampshire. She went head-to-head against Piacentini twice, and remembers the shifty, speedy player with a nose for the puck.“Every single time there was a loose puck in front of the net, I just remember her being right there,” she said.In the third period of Syracuse’s season opener against Clarkson on Oct. 6, Piacentini corralled a loose puck off a deflection on the left side of the net and wrapped around to the right side, flicking the puck into the goal.She’s made a living of using her small size to dig out pucks around the net in her time at Syracuse.Gilligan joked that even during practice, Piacentini gets in her grill, acting as a “pot stirrer” in front of the net. After experiencing it from both sides, Gilligan is content just watching. “Every single time I’m in the net against Tini, I just shake my head because I’m like, ‘Thank goodness I don’t have deal with this again against her,’” Gilligan said. Yet for all the fire Piacentini brings to the ice, she also brings to it a sense of calm. In her four years, Flanagan said that Piacentini’s greatest development has been in the cerebral part of her game.From the moment she walked onto the ice as a freshman, Flanagan said, her fundamentals have always been ahead of the curve. Her progression has been a matter of polishing the little things and refining the mental parts of her game. “I think I’ve grown as a person,” Piacentini said. “Just being in the locker room they kind of instill those different life lessons in you and the mental toughness aspect of it all. I think over the years, I’ve just grown to become more mentally strong in terms of staying focused.”As a freshman, Piacentini found herself looking on from afar with four weeks to think things through. Now, she’s better adept at reading and handling situations and recognizing her own mistakes. “Her hockey knowledge just seems to calm everybody down on the team,” Gilligan said. “When she’s out there, we don’t panic as much as maybe we necessarily should.”Against Clarkson, Piacentini skated out for her final home opener. But the emotions were kept in check, and the focus was solely on winning the first CHA conference title and proving Syracuse could compete against anyone. And this time, Piacentini wasn’t on the bench. “I think Tini’s just going to do Tini,” Gilligan said. “…She’s just going to go after it and get done what she needs to get done and I think everybody else will follow after that.” Commentslast_img read more